Friday, 20 July 2018

Mapping Mountains – Summit Relocations – The Fours


Exford South Common (SS 808 374)

There has been a Summit Relocation to a hill that is listed in The Fours initiated by LIDAR analysis conducted by Aled Williams.  The Fours is the title for the list of 400m hills of England and is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams with the 2nd edition of the booklet containing this list published by Mapping Mountains Publications on the 24th April 2018.

The criteria for the list that this summit relocation affects are:

English hills at or above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop.

The name of the hill is Exford South Common and it is situated in Region 41 South-Central England, with its Cardinal Hill being Dunkery Beacon (SS 891 415).  The hill is positioned with the B 3224 road to its north and minor roads to its west and east, and has the villages of Simonsbath to the west north-west and Exford to the east north-east.

The field where the relocated summit position is situated is a part of designated open access land, and this has direct access from the end of a minor road to the west of the summit and can also be accessed from public footpaths to the south and east of the hill.

The summit area of this hill has a 412m spot height on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map which is positioned at SS 80917 37526, and it was this height and its position that was given as that of the summit of this hill in the 1st edition of The Fours when published by Europeaklist in December 2013.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website with the summit position circled

The highest land in the uppermost 410m ring contour was analysed via LIDAR by Aled Williams.  The LIDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) technique is highly accurate height data that is now freely available for much of England and Wales. 

The summit height produced by LIDAR analysis is 411.5m and is positioned at SS 80885 37482, this position is not given a spot height on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, although it is within the boundary of the uppermost 410m contour ring.

Therefore, the relocated summit position is at SS 80885 37482 and this is approximately 60 metres south-westward and importantly in a different field from where the previous listed 412m map heighted summit was given in the 1st edition of The Fours when published by Europeaklist in December 2013.


The full details for the hill are:

Cardinal Hill:  Dunkery Beacon

Summit Height:  411.5m (LIDAR)

Name:  Exford South Common

OS 1:50,000 map:  181

Summit Grid Reference (New Position):  SS 80885 37482 (LIDAR)  

Drop:  34.5m (LIDAR)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (July 2018)












Thursday, 19 July 2018

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – 200m Twmpau


Foel (SH 632 045)

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in the 200m Twmpau, with the summit height, drop and status of the hill being confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey which took place on the 14th May 2018.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

200m Twmpau – All Welsh hills at or above 200m and below 300m in height that have 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub category entitled the 200m Sub-Twmpau consisting of all Welsh hills at or above 200m and below 300m in height that have 20m or more and below 30m of drop.  With the word Twmpau being an acronym standing for thirty welsh metre prominences and upward. 

The hill is adjoined to the Tarennydd range of hills which are situated in the south-western part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A3), and it overlooks the B 4405 road and the Afon Fathew to the south-east and the Afon Dysynni to the north-west, and has the small community of Dolgoch to its east and Bryn-crug to its south-west. 

Foel (SH 632 045)

The hill appeared in the 200m P30 list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website under the name of Foel Wyllt.  During my early hill listing I paid little regard to name placement on the map, or the meaning of names and to what feature the name was appropriately applied to.  Therefore I prioritised names for listing purposes that I now understand are either inappropriate or where another name is considered as being more appropriate.  By using the name Foel Wyllt for this hill I was conveniently using the name that appears nearest its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps and which is more strictly applicable to the whole land mass taking in a number of what can be considered as separate hills. 
  

Foel Wyllt
    288m
    SH632045
    135
23


The placement of names on Ordnance Survey maps can be best confirmed either through historical research and / or through local enquiry, and in the case of this hill it was the local farmer who owns and grazes sheep on the land that the summit of this hill is situated who gave the name of Foel and explained that Foel Wyllt takes in the whole mountain (as in, the whole land mass), including what hill list compilers and hill baggers would consider as other separate hills.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey One Inch 'Old Series' map

The local farmer is Stephen Jones who farms from Llanerch-goediog which is situated directly below the hill to its east.  After visiting this hill I called at the farm and met Stephen, who is aged 55 and a Welsh speaker and has lived at this farm for the whole of his life except for three years while at university.  We spent a number of minutes talking about the hills and their names, and two other names that Stephen also gave me will be documented in separate Significant Name Changes posts.  Stephen told me that this hill is a part of his land and that he knows it as Foel (Stephen used this name without the definite article ‘Y’).  

Stephen Jones

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in the 200m Twmpau is Foel and this name was derived from local enquiry.


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Tarennydd

Name:  Foel
 
Previously Listed Name:  Foel Wyllt 

Summit Height:  288.3m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  135

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 63297 04583
  
Drop:  30.6m (converted to OSGM15)


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Foel



Myrddyn Phillips (July 2018)











Wednesday, 18 July 2018

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – The Fours


Moughton Scars (SD 786 711)

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with this being announced when the 2nd edition of The Fours was published by Mapping Mountains Publications on the 24th April 2018.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at or above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop.

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list published by Mapping Mountains Publications and by Haroldstreet on the 24th April 2018.

The hill is situated in the Central Pennines and is placed in Region 35, Section 35B with its Cardinal Hill being Whernside (SD 738 814).  The hill is positioned with the A 65 road to its south-west and the B 6479 road to its east, and has the village of Austwick towards the south-west and the village of Horton in Ribblesdale towards the north-east.

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Moughton, and this was also the name the hill appeared as when the list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as Moughton in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013. 

Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of this hill it was research conducted by Aled to names used on the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps that concluded that the name of Moughton Scars is a more appropriate name for this hill.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Moughton Scars and this was derived from the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps. 


The full details for the hill are:

Cardinal Hill:  Whernside

Name:  Moughton Scars

Previously Listed Name:  Moughton
 
Summit Height:  427.4m (LIDAR)

OS 1:50,000 map:  98

Summit Grid Reference:  SD 78677 71191 (LIDAR) 
 
Drop:  74.1m (LIDAR)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (July 2018)







Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Mapping Mountains – Trimble Surveys – Tarennydd



14.05.18  Foel (SH 632 045), Foel Cocyn (SH 624 042), Foel Tyddyn y Berllan (SH 634 051), Gamallt (SH 665 067), Coed Uchaf (SH 649 055), Castell (SH 655 061), Pt. 230.2m (SH 648 063), Craig yr Aderyn (SH 647 065) and Craig yr Aderyn (SH 643 068)

Craig yr Aderyn with Cadair Idris as backdrop

Rising above and to the south of the flat bedded Dyffryn Dysynni is a small land mass enclosing a number of individual hills, this land is topographically adjoined to the Tarennydd, although on first view it extends from land adjoined to the hills of Cadair Idris, with it only being separated by the Afon Dysynni.

I’d contemplated visiting these hills for a number of years, but other hills (as they are prone) had got in the way.  However, after producing a number of accurate heights for both summit and bwlch for these hills via LIDAR analysis I thought it time that I visited, and with the weather set fine I set off for Dolgoch; a small community on the southern side of these hills.

I knew from LIDAR analysis that two of the eight hills I planned on visiting were additions to the Welsh 200m P30 list, and gathering data with the Trimble would no doubt confirm this.

One of the new Welsh P30s - Foel Tyddyn y Berllan (SH 634 051)

A short walk on the B road brought me to the lower part of the first hill’s eastern ridge (the hill is known locally by the farmer who grazes this land as Foel), this climbed steadily upward bathed in the early morning’s sunshine with an old fence following the ridge line and scattered sheep and their lambs contentedly grazing.

The other new Welsh P30 - Foel (SH 632 045)

As height was gained the view opened, and to the north-east Cadair Idris rose highlighted in sunshine with an unadulterated backdrop of delicate blue, the foreground was framed by the hills I planned on visiting and surveying, one led to another, and all looked inviting.

Cadair Idris

Light and shade were accentuated subtleties in shape and profile with the hills of Craig yr Aderyn always drawing the eye, however nestled below this backdrop was the second new P30, this is known locally as Foel Tyddyn y Berllan and its new status awaited confirmation by the Trimble GeoXH 6000.

Foel Tyddyn y Berllan in shade with Craig yr Aderyn in the background

The summit of Foel consists of ground at the base of the ridge fence and within a few minutes of arriving at the high point, the Trimble was positioned on top of a fence post and the measurement offset taken from its internal antenna to the ground below.

Gathering data at the summit of Foel

My second of eight hills on this walk was also the highest and although named as Ffridd Cocyn on Ordnance Survey maps it is known locally by the farmers who I spoke to as Foel Cocyn, although I was surprised with this name it makes sense as a ffridd would apply to an enclosed field and not the whole hill, whilst the term foel would apply to the latter.

Foel Cocyn (SH 624 042)

On my way to Foel Cocyn was the connecting and critical bwlch for Foel, this proved to be positioned in thick grass that merged with a section of reed grass, one shined green in the sun, whilst the other swayed delicately in the morning’s breeze.

Gathering data at the critical bwlch of Foel

A path led up the eastern slopes of Foel Cocyn but I diverted from it when I saw a quad bike heading up toward me from the north, Edward Cook was out with a colleague and two sheep dogs and we talked for a number of minutes, he was the first farmer that gave me the name of Foel Cocyn for the hill explaining that the word cocyn refers to the small hummocks on the hill’s western slopes.

Edward Cook and colleague

After a well-earned rest during which the Trimble gathered its allotted data from the summit of Foel Cocyn, I backtracked toward Foel and continued down from its connecting bwlch heading northward to the bwlch connecting it with Foel Tyddyn y Berllan.

Gathering data at the summit of Foel Cocyn


Foel Tyddyn y Berllan and Craig yr Aderyn

After the bwlch survey I headed to the summit which has a small and attractive rock outcrop as its high point.  As the Trimble gathered data I stood and looked north-eastward toward Craig yr Aderyn, a marvellous view bathed in crisp morning light with the constant backdrop of the iconic Cadair Idris adding height and depth to the scene.

Gathering data at the summit of Foel Tyddyn y Berllan


Castell and Coed Uchaf from Foel Tyddyn y Berllan

By now the day’s warmth was increasing in intensity and the route down toward the outskirts of the small community of Abertrinant was eased with an earthen track leading to the farm of Llanerch-goediog, where I met Stephen Jones whose hills I had just visited and who gave me the name of Foel and Foel Tyddyn y Berllan, explaining that Foel Wyllt, which is a name appearing near these hills on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, takes in the whole mountain, as in the whole land mass extending south-westward above his farm.

Stephen Jones

After noting the names Stephen gave, I explained about the Trimble and asked if he minded me visiting the adjacent field to survey the critical bwlch of Gamallt, which is a prominent hill to the north-east and one whose summit would have to wait for another day.  Stephen directed me toward the bwlch, telling me to cross the fence that he said was not barbed and then directed me through the field to a gate and my onward route to the next hill, which is known locally as Coed Uchaf.

The critical bwlch of Gamallt was beside a small land bridge and stream at the base of the fence.  It was an attractive spot to shelter under a large tree out of the sun as the allotted data were gathered.  By now the sky was an intense darkened blue, the heat clear and thankfully not oppressive and although the day was warming up it was a delight to be out on the hill.

Gathering data at the critical bwlch of Gamallt

I followed Stephen’s direction from the bwlch and headed toward the gate which gave access to another field and a route toward the summit of Coed Uchaf, it was a steady plod to its high point and whilst slowly making progress a quad bike buzzed around adjacent land, and as the Trimble gathered summit data it arrived close to the top, I waved and headed over to talk with Joanne Redman who was out taking photos of her father’s farm in the valley below.

Wales' two new P30s; Foel (on left) and Foel Tyddyn y Berllan (on right)


Joanne Redman

Joanne recommended I should contact her father; Tomos and kindly gave me his telephone number, I phoned him the next day and also visited him the following week, Joanne told me that the hill we were on is known as Coed Uchaf and is a part of their land, this was also a name that Stephen Jones had used for this hill, with the name being taken from the high wood just to the south-east of the summit, this shone emerald like with summer’s fresh growth.

Gathering data at the summit of Coed Uchaf


Castell from Coed Uchaf

As expected the walk was proving a delight with the hills quiet and sun bathed and the opportunity to meet and talk with local farmers who in the main are an ever reliant, friendly and knowledgeable group of people.

It was only a short walk down to the next connecting bwlch past wooded groups of stunted oak, the leafs of which cast out an early summer beauty.  This section of the walk was an absolute joy, it was as if the hills were transferring me from one land to another and between was a myriad of small oak woods, old and fixed with seasonal change bringing growth and colour, they led me from the bwlch to steepening ground and the next hill of the day; Castell.

Stunted oak

This hill had stood out from afar, and although those of Craig yr Aderyn are more dramatic in nature, this hill gave a dominant profile from the south and was dotted with stunted oak on its lower slopes, with its higher bringing expansive views.

Looking back on my inward route with Coed Uchaf, Foel, Foel Cocyn and Foel Tyddyn y Berllan all in view

Once the summit of Castell was Trimbled I headed down to the next bwlch which was close to a wet area which brought contrast to the land.  Just three hills remained to survey and these were more dramatic in nature with rugged slopes and plummeting cliffs which contrasted with the greened grazing land of the hills already visited.

Gathering data at the summit of Castell


Coed Uchaf

The next hill I visited is unnamed on the map and an individual name for it was not known amongst the farmers who I had met during the walk and then later visited, it has two 231m map heighted summits, their high points each close to prominent cairns, both were Trimbled before the hill’s connecting bwlch was also surveyed.

The summit of the next hill has a large and ancient cairn at its high point, which has now been fashioned to incorporate a wind shelter, local knowledge does not differentiate this hill from its lower and adjacent north-westerly hill, and both are known as being a part of Bird’s Rock / Craig yr Aderyn.

Gathering data at the summit of Craig yr Aderyn (SH 647 065)

Only three surveys now remained and after the bwlch for the lower of the Craig yr Aderyn hills was surveyed I followed the path toward its summit.  Looking back the upper northerly section of the higher hill plummeted downward in a great cliff leading to the flat topped summit of Tap y Botel, this is another locally known name and this small hill is dominated by its near neighbours and yet it is also dramatic in nature sitting as a small bulk of a hill in what can be considered as being part of mountain land.

From this last summit of the day the view mesmerized as the Afon Dysynni slowly ebbed toward the sea in the beautiful greened valley of the Dysynni, and above were the hills; pastoral green and inviting with Cadair Idris dominating the opposing view at the head of the valley.

The view down Dyffryn Dysynni from the summit of Craig yr Aderyn (SH 643 068)

Once data were gathered I left this hill and followed my inward route back up to a fence line before connecting with a path that led down to a gate and the narrow paved road leading toward the old house of Rhiwerfa.

Gathering data at the summit of Craig yr Aderyn (SH 643 068)

When I reached the paved road I sat on the grassed bank beside it and luxuriated myself in the afternoon sun, and ate a chocolate bar and sandwich, my first nourishment of the day.  Above the emerald profile of the higher of the Craig yr Aderyn hills shone down with green piercing hue.

Craig yr Aderyn (SH 647 065)

The road was my access point back toward my car at Dolgoch, but before the path through the wood that would take me downward, one survey remained, this was the critical bwlch of Castell and it is positioned in a field next to a relatively new house which is close to the old house of Rhiwerfa.  As the Trimble gathered its last and seventeenth data set of the day I stood in shade happy in the knowledge that all points I had wanted to survey had been Trimbled and another seven P30s and one sub had been visited.

Fern and bluebells


Gathering data at the critical bwlch of Castell

Once the Trimble was packed away I followed the paved lane down to the next corner and then a steep path through a wood leading toward the house of Tyn-y-coed-uchaf, the path now levelled and continued south-westward toward the B road and after 11 hours on the hill, my awaiting car at Dolgoch.



Survey Result:



Summit Height:  288.3m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 63297 04583

Bwlch Height:  257.7m (converted to OSGM15)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 62971 04432

Drop:  30.6m (200m Sub-Twmpau reclassified to 200m Twmpau)

Dominance:  10.61%





Foel Cocyn (significant name change)

Summit Height:  312.9m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 62455 04290

Bwlch Height:  62.5m (LIDAR)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 67119 06459 (LIDAR)

Drop:  250.4m (Trimble summit and LIDAR bwlch)

Dominance:  80.03%





Foel Tyddyn y Berllan (significant name change)

Summit Height:  232.8m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 63481 05158

Bwlch Height:  200.3m (converted to OSGM15)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 63494 04961

Drop:  32.5m (200m Sub-Twmpau reclassified to 200m Twmpau)

Dominance:  13.94%





Gamallt

Summit Height:  288.4m (LIDAR)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 66549 06761 (LIDAR)

Bwlch Height:  80.1m (converted to OSGM15)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 64227 05008

Drop:  208.2m (LIDAR summit and Trimble bwlch)

Dominance:  72.21%





Coed Uchaf (significant name change)

Summit Height:  216.5m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 64901 05582

Bwlch Height:  175.5m (converted to OSGM15)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 65174 05620

Drop:  41.0m

Dominance:  18.95%





Castell (significant name change)

Summit Height:  267.5m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 65561 06144

Bwlch Height:  179.1m (converted to OSGM15)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 65917 06266

Drop:  88.4m

Dominance:  33.05% (non Lesser Dominant status confirmed)





Pt. 230.2m

Summit Height:  230.2m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 64855 06337

Bwlch Height:  203.2m (converted to OSGM15)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 64807 06441

Drop:  27.0m

Dominance:  11.73%





Craig yr Aderyn (significant name change)

Summit Height:  257.4m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 64703 06582

Bwlch Height:  171.0m (converted to OSGM15)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 65190 06417

Drop:  86.4m

Dominance:  33.56% (Lesser Dominant status confirmed)





Craig yr Aderyn

Summit Height:  232.5m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 64367 06866

Bwlch Height:  181.0m (converted to OSGM15)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 64569 06814

Drop:  51.5m

Dominance:  22.14%