Saturday, 16 February 2019

Mapping Mountains – Hill Reclassifications – Humps


Mynydd Gelliwastad (SN 678 016) – Hump reclassified to Subhump

This is the thirty fourth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has either been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated, or it is the recommendation that their status is altered.

Many preceding posts detailing these hill reclassifications to the Humps are retrospective as they were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website, or from surveying with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, or from LIDAR analysis, and for this reclassification that affected the Humps the email I posted on the Tump Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 31.10.18.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the hill reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by LIDAR analysis conducted by Myrddyn Phillips.

This hill has a convoluted history of classification within the Humps with it initially listed as a Subhump with c 96m of drop based on the 213m spot height adjoined to a triangulation pillar positioned at SN 67799 01456 and an estimated bwlch height of c 117m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  This hill was then reclassified to a Hump (see Humps Reclassification post) based on the 213m trig pillar height and interpolation of 5m bwlch contours on the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website which refined the estimated height of the bwlch to c 113m, with these values giving this hill c 100m of drop and its reclassification to Hump status was accepted on the 19.07.12. 

However, the advent of LIDAR has meant greater accuracy for summit and bwlch heights and their positions, with LIDAR analysis giving this hill a 213.9m summit height positioned at SN 67852 01598 and a 114.8m bwlch height positioned at SN 67677 02435, with these values giving this hill 99.1m of drop, which is insufficient for it to retain its Hump status.

LIDAR summit image of Mynydd Gelliwastad

LIDAR bwlch image of Mynydd Gelliwastad

The reclassification of this hill from Hump to Subhump status was accepted and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 31.10.18.


The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Mynydd Gelliwastad

OS 1:50,000 map:  159

OS 1:25,000 map:  165

Summit Height:  214.0m (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 67855 01603 (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)

Bwlch Height:  114.8m (LIDAR)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SN 6767 0243 (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  99.1m (LIDAR)


Myrddyn Phillips (February 2019)







Friday, 15 February 2019

Mapping Mountains – Trimble Surveys – Carneddau


10.10.18  Coed Bodlondeb (SH 779 781)  

It was nearing the end of another bagging day but I wanted to visit two other hills before the sun sank and darkness fell, and the first of these two summits was Coed Bodlondeb, with its P30 status first noted by Mark Jackson in August 2015.

This hill is situated on the outskirts of Conwy and rises above the Conwy County Borough Council Offices and is wooded.  However, it has a number of paths leading toward its summit and I hoped to find one as I drove in to the County Council Offices car park and rather conveniently found the pay and display machine out of order.

I asked a passer-by if they knew where the start of a path leading up in to the wood was situated, and was kindly directed to stone steps leading in to the wood at the back of the large and grand building making up a part of the offices.

The steps lead the way

The wood is deciduous and proved beautiful to walk through with sunlight penetrating the canopy and autumn’s first colour change giving a semblance of variety.

The path through the wood

I soon arrived at the wooden bench which nestles beside the path and copious amounts of gorse that signify the top of this hill, with the high point beside one of the prickly gorse bushes I wondered how long it would take the Trimble to attain its 0.1m accuracy level before data should be logged.  Thankfully this was attained relatively quickly, and once the equipment was activated it beeped away gathering the allotted 600 datum points.

The Trimble set-up position at the summit of Coed Bodlondeb

During data collection I stood back on the continuation of the path as it headed north out of the wood.  Thankfully no one appeared as the Trimble gathered data and although the summit didn’t afford any view it was still a quiet and tranquil place to spend the late afternoon.

Gathering data at the summit of Coed Bodlondeb

Once data were gathered and stored and the Trimble switched off and packed away I retraced my inward route back to my awaiting car, and then drove toward my last hill of the day; Foel Gron (SH 583 621) which is situated above Deiniolen.

    

Survey Result:


Coed Bodlondeb (significant name change) 

Summit Height:  55.6m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 77921 78114

Bwlch Height:  22.9m (LIDAR, natural bwlch) (with the A55 road cutting increasing the depth of the man-made bwlch to 12.0m)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 77852 77725 (LIDAR, natural bwlch) (with the A55 man-made road cutting bwlch positioned at SH 77683 77840)

Drop:  32.6m (Trimble summit and LIDAR bwlch) (30-99m Twmpau addition)

Dominance:  58.70% (Trimble summit and LIDAR bwlch) (Dominant addition)







Thursday, 14 February 2019

Mapping Mountains – Hill Reclassifications – 100m Twmpau


Bryniau (SH 579 711) – 100m Sub-Twmpau reclassified to 100m Twmpau

There has been confirmation of a Hill Reclassification to a hill that is listed in the 100m Twmpau, with the summit height and its location, drop and status of the hill initially confirmed by LIDAR analysis and subsequently by a summit survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which were conducted by Myrddyn Phillips, with the latter taking place on the 1st October 2018.

LIDAR image of Bryniau

The criteria for the list that this hill reclassification applies to are:

100m Twmpau - Welsh hills at or above 100m and below 200m in height with 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the 100m Sub-Twmpau with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 100m and below 200m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop, with the word Twmpau being an acronym standing for thirty welsh metre prominences and upward.

When the original Welsh P30 hills were published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website this hill was included in the Hills to be surveyed sub list that accompanied the 100m height band of P30 hills as it did not at that stage meet the criteria used in this list.  When the sub list was standardised, and interpolated heights and drop values also included this hill was listed with an estimated c 30m of drop, based on the 117m spot height adjoined to a triangulation pillar positioned at SH 57894 71129 and an estimated bwlch height of c 87m based on interpolation of bwlch contouring on Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer maps. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

The drop value was re-assessed when the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map became available online via the Geograph website, this mapping has a 118m spot height positioned to the north-east of the trig pillar at SH 579 711, which resulted in the summit relocation of this hill from ground beside its triangulation pillar, and the drop value was again estimated to be c 30m, with a revised estimated bwlch height of c 88m.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website

However, it was not until LIDAR became available that these two positions could be compared and confirmation that the land where the 118m spot height appears is higher than the land beside the 117m map heighted trig pillar and that the hill had sufficient drop to be classified as a P30.

LIDAR image of Bryniau

The land where the summit of this hill is situated is a part of Bryniau and this was derived from local enquiry and substantiated from the Tithe map, and it is the name that this hill is now listed by.  The hill is adjoined to the Glyderau group of hills, which are situated in the north-western part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A1), and is positioned with the A4087 road to its west and minor roads to its south and east, and has the small city of Bangor towards its north.

If wanting to visit the hill permission to do so should be sought as the summit area is not a part of designated open access land, for those wishing to do so the easiest approach is via a track leading to the old farmhouse of Bryniau.

The confirmation of the reclassification of Bryniau to 100m Twmpau status is due to LIDAR analysis and a summit survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 conducted by Myrddyn Phillips, resulting in a 117.6m summit height and an 87.4m bwlch height, with these values giving this hill 30.1m of drop which is sufficient for it to be classified as a 100m Twmpau.

 
The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Bryniau

The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Glyderau

Name:  Bryniau

OS 1:50,000 map:  114, 115

Summit Height:  117.6m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 57971 71196

Bwlch Height:  87.4m (LIDAR)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 57748 70845 (LIDAR) 

Drop:  30.1m (Trimble summit and LIDAR bwlch)



Myrddyn Phillips (February 2019)






Wednesday, 13 February 2019

Andy Nisbet


Just over a week ago Andy Nisbet and Steve Perry died on Ben Hope in the north of Scotland.  I had not met Steve, but had the privilege to have met Andy on a number of occasions whilst being a part of the Heightings for The Munro Society (TMS) and the Scottish Mountaineering Club (SMC).



Over recent years the pair had forged a strong climbing partnership.  Prior to this Steve had completed a long distance walk from Land’s End to John O’Groats taking in all the 3000ft hills on the way, two years later in 2005-2006 he completed a continuous winter traverse of all the Munros; a phenomenal achievement and one that has not been repeated since.  His winter Munro round finished on the most northerly Munro; Ben Hope, and it was this hill that Steve and Andy were pioneering new routes on when they met their death.

Andy’s climbing achievements amongst the Scottish hills are unparalleled as he was considered the most prolific Scottish winter climber that the country has ever produced.  He accumulated over 1000 new Scottish winter climbing routes and was a past President of the SMC.  As I did not know Steve, my memories are of Andy; he seemed a quietly confident person with an ever ready smile and was not brash but humble considering his achievements. 

During the Heightings on Skye, Andy was good enough to participate in an interview which I conducted with my digi-camcorder and which was then posted on YouTube.  When I heard of Andy’s death I sat and watched and listened to this interview and felt saddened that someone so highly regarded  and who was such a nice person was no longer with us.  The interview appears below, and I hope in some small way it is a testament to Andy.

At this sad time my thoughts are with Andy and Steve’s family and loved ones.




Mapping Mountains – Summit Relocations – 100m Twmpau and Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales


Cae Ddu Main (SN 622 983)

There has been a Summit Relocation to a hill that is listed in the 100m Twmpau and also now in Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales, with the summit height, its location, the drop and status of the hill confirmed by LIDAR analysis conducted by Myrddyn Phillips.

LIDAR image of Cae Ddu Main

The criteria for the two lists that this summit relocation applies to are:

100m Twmpau - Welsh hills at or above 100m and below 200m in height with 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the 100m Sub-Twmpau with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 100m and below 200m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop, with the word Twmpau being an acronym standing for thirty welsh metre prominences and upward.

Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales – Welsh P30 hills whose prominence equal or exceed half that of their absolute height.  With the criteria for Lesser Dominant status being those additional Welsh P30 hills whose prominence is between one third and half that of their absolute height.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips with the Introduction to the start of the Mapping Mountains publication of this list appearing on the 3rd December 2015.

The name of the bounded land where the summit of this hill is situated is Cae Ddu Main and this was derived from the Tithe map, and it is this name that the hill is now listed by.  The hill is adjoined to the Mynydd Penlle’rcastell group of hills, which are situated in the western part of South Wales (Region C, Sub-Region C1), and is positioned with the A483 road to its immediate west and the A48 and M4 to its north, and has the village of Penlle’r-gaer to its north.

If wanting to visit the hill permission to do so should be sought as the summit area is not a part of designated open access land, for those wishing to do so an approach from the north may be feasible.

When the original Welsh 100m P30 list was published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website the summit location of this hill was given to the 102m spot height that is positioned at SS 619 984 on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer maps.  However, the 1:25,000 Explorer map has a small uppermost 105m ring contour to the east of the 102m spot height.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

The summit relocation to land within the 105m ring contour has now been confirmed by LIDAR analysis and this land is confirmed as higher than that at the 102m spot height to its west.

The summit height produced by LIDAR analysis is 106.9m to remaining natural ground, and its position in relation to that originally given comes within the parameters of the Summit Relocations used within this page heading, these parameters are:

The term Summit Relocations applies to any listed hill whose summit meets the following criteria; where there are a number of potential summit positions within close proximity and the highest point is not where previously given, or a relocation of approximately 100 metres or more in distance from either the position of a map spot height or from where the summit of the hill was previously thought to exist, or when the summit of the hill is in a different field compared to where previously given, or when the natural and intact summit of a hill is confirmed compared to a higher point such as a raised field boundary that is judged to be a relatively recent man-made construct.  As heights on different scaled Ordnance Survey maps are not consistent the height given on the 1:25,000 Explorer map is being prioritised in favour of the 1:50,000 Landranger map for detailing these relocations.

The summit height produced by LIDAR analysis is 106.9m to remaining natural ground and is positioned at SS 62212 98337, this position is approximately 290 metres east from where the summit was originally listed at the position of the 102m spot height.


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Mynydd Penlle’rcastell

Name:  Cae Ddu Main

OS 1:50,000 map:  159

Summit Height:  106.9m (LIDAR, remaining natural high point)

Summit Grid Reference (new position):  SN 62212 98337 (LIDAR, remaining natural high point)

Bwlch Height:  69.1m (LIDAR, natural bwlch)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SN 62051 00000 (LIDAR, natural bwlch) 

Drop:  37.8m (LIDAR)

Dominance:  35.34% (LIDAR)


Myrddyn Phillips (February 2019)




Tuesday, 12 February 2019

Mapping Mountains – Summit Relocations – 100m Twmpau



Bryniau (SH 579 711)

There has been a Summit Relocation to a hill that is listed in the 100m Twmpau, with the summit height and its location, drop and status of the hill initially confirmed by LIDAR analysis and subsequently by a summit survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which were conducted by Myrddyn Phillips, with the latter taking place on the 1st October 2018.

Bryniau (SH 579 711)

The criteria for the list that this summit relocation applies to are:

100m Twmpau - Welsh hills at or above 100m and below 200m in height with 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the 100m Sub-Twmpau with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 100m and below 200m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop, with the word Twmpau being an acronym standing for thirty welsh metre prominences and upward.

The land where the summit of this hill is situated is a part of Bryniau and this was derived from local enquiry and substantiated from the Tithe map, and it is the name that this hill is now listed by.  The hill is adjoined to the Glyderau group of hills, which are situated in the north-western part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A1), and is positioned with the A4087 road to its west and minor roads to its south and east, and has the small city of Bangor towards its north.

If wanting to visit the hill permission to do so should be sought as the summit area is not a part of designated open access land, for those wishing to do so the easiest approach is via a track leading to the old farmhouse of Bryniau.

When the original Welsh 100m P30 list was published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website the summit location of this hill was given to the 117m spot height adjoined to a triangulation pillar that appeared on contemporary Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer maps and which is positioned at SH 578 711.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

The details for this hill were re-examined when the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website became available online and this map gives a 118m spot height positioned to the north-east of the trig pillar at SH 579 711.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website

However, it was not until LIDAR became available that these two positions could be compared and confirmation that the land where the 118m spot height appears is higher than the land beside the 117 map heighted trig pillar.

LIDAR image of Bryniau

The summit height produced by the Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey is 117.6m, and its position in relation to that originally given comes within the parameters of the Summit Relocations used within this page heading, these parameters are:

The term Summit Relocations applies to any listed hill whose summit meets the following criteria; where there are a number of potential summit positions within close proximity and the highest point is not where previously given, or a relocation of approximately 100 metres or more in distance from either the position of a map spot height or from where the summit of the hill was previously thought to exist, or when the summit of the hill is in a different field compared to where previously given, or when the natural and intact summit of a hill is confirmed compared to a higher point such as a raised field boundary that is judged to be a relatively recent man-made construct.  As heights on different scaled Ordnance Survey maps are not consistent the height given on the 1:25,000 Explorer map is being prioritised in favour of the 1:50,000 Landranger map for detailing these relocations.

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Bryniau

The summit height produced by the Trimble GeoXH 6000 is 117.6m and is positioned at SH 57971 71196, this position is approximately 80 metres north-east from where the summit was originally listed at this hill’s triangulation pillar.

 
The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Glyderau

Name:  Bryniau

OS 1:50,000 map:  114, 115

Summit Height:  117.6m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference (new position):  SH 57971 71196

Bwlch Height:  87.4m (LIDAR)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 57748 70845 (LIDAR)
 
Drop:  30.1m (Trimble summit and LIDAR bwlch)



Myrddyn Phillips (February 2019)





Monday, 11 February 2019

Mapping Mountains – Hill Reclassifications – Humps


Iolyn Park relocated to SH 781 758 – Subhump relocation

This is the thirty third in a series of Hill Reclassification and Summit Relocation posts that detail hills whose status or location has either been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated, or it is the recommendation that their status is altered.

The summit of the Subhump named Iolyn Park is now relocated to the grazing field on the right in the background of this photo

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

Many preceding posts detailing these alterations to the Humps are retrospective as these hill reclassifications and summit relocations were either initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map that is hosted on the Geograph website, or initiated from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for this summit relocation that affects the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 10.10.18, with the recommendation of this summit relocation posted on the Tump Yahoo Group forum on the 13.10.18.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the summit relocation appear below:

There has been a summit relocation to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 conducted by Myrddyn Phillips and which took place on the 10.10.18.

This summit relocation applies to two summits that also have a third adjoining summit all of similar map height that are orientated north to south with a northern, central and southern summit.  These three summits and their map details appear below:


Northern summit:  130m spot summit positioned at SH 78114 75813

Central summit:  130m ring contour positioned at SH 77799 75564

Southern summit:  130m ring contour positioned at SH 77584 75224


Mark Jackson gave the following details to these summits when he first collated the list of Tumps:


Northern summit:  Iolyn Park NE Top with 130m summit at SH 781 758 with c 34m of drop

Central summit:  not listed

Southern summit:  Iolyn Park with c 131m summit at SH 776 752 with c 97m of drop


The two hills listed in the original Tumps match those that Myrddyn Phillips listed in the original list of Welsh P30 hills that superseded the Tumps by a number of years.  The details in the Tumps were amended on the 25.11.12 and 19.11.13 resulting in the following:


Northern summit:  not listed

Central summit:  Iolyn Park with 130m summit at SH 777 755 with 96m of drop

Southern summit:  Gorse Hill with 130m summit at SH 775 752 with 33m of drop


Therefore at the time of the Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey on the 10.10.18 the Subhump was listed as Iolyn Park with a 130m summit positioned at SH 777 755 with 96m of drop.

These three summits were surveyed using the Trimble GeoXH 6000 resulting in the following:


Northern summit:  129.073m summit at SH 78116 75814

Central summit:  128.446m summit at SH 77790 75561

Southerly summit:  128.459m summit at SH 77584 75224


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 set-up position at the northerly summit which is now the relocated summit of the Subhump

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 set-up position at the central summit which was the old summit of the Subhump

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 set-up position at the southerly summit which was originally listed in the Tumps with c 97m of drop

The Subhump is listed under the name of Iolyn Park; this name appears on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps adjacent to land where the southern summit is situated.  However, research via the Tithe map and local enquiries with the owner of the Gorse Hill Caravan Park has resulted in the following names:


Northern summit:  Cae Alen (Tithe map)

Central summit:  Bwlch Mawr (Tithe map and local enquiry)

Southern summit:  Bryn Eithin (English map name and local enquiry)


These three summits are adjoined to the Carneddau range of hills and they are situated overlooking the Afon Conwy to the east and the B5106 road to the west, and have the town of Conwy towards the north.

The summit relocation of the Subhump was accepted and its new summit position augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 31.10.18.


The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Iolyn Park (as listed in the Humps)

OS 1:50,000 map:  115

OS 1:25,000 map:  17

Summit Height:  129.0m (as listed in the Humps, with the Trimble survey giving 129.1m)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 781 758 (as listed in the Humps, with the Trimble giving SH 78116 75814)

Bwlch Height:  34m (as listed in the Humps, with LIDAR giving 34.8m)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 776 740 (as listed in the Humps, with LIDAR giving SH 77629 74003)

Drop:  95m (as listed in the Humps, with Trimble summit and LIDAR bwlch giving 94.3m drop)


Myrddyn Phillips (February 2019)