Wednesday, 31 January 2018

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – The Fours


The Cold Piece (SO 338 996)

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the height, drop and status of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 5th November 2014.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

Accompanying the main list of The Fours are three categories of sub hills, with this hill being reclassified to the 390m Sub-Four categoryThe criteria for 390m Sub-Four status are all English hills at or above 390m and below 400m in height that have a minimum 30m of drop.

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being the Stiperstones (SO 367 986).  The hill is positioned above the A 488 road and the upper reaches of the Hope Valley which are to its north-west, and has the small community of Snailbeach towards the north-east.

The Cold Piece (SO 338 996)

Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of Shelve Hill this name has been consistently applied by the Ordnance Survey to land south-west of this hill’s summit and approximately 1km from it.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found, and in the case of this hill it was research conducted by Aled Williams with a local farmer who gave the name of The Cold Piece for this hill.

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Shelve Hill, this was also the name it appeared as when the list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as The Cold Piece in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013. 


Shelve Hill        400c        SO 338 997



Named from village to the South


Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of Shelve Hill this name has been consistently applied by the Ordnance Survey to land south-west of this hill’s summit and approximately 1km from it.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found, and in this case it was research conducted by Aled Williams with a local farmer who gave the name of The Cold Piece for this hill.

  
Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Historical map

Extract from the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is The Cold Piece and this was derived from local enquiry. 


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Stiperstones

Name:  The Cold Piece

Previously Listed Name:  Shelve Hill
 
Summit Height:  399.5m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 33849 99695 
 
Drop:  57.5m (converted to OSGM15)

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of The Cold Piece (SO 338 996)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (January 2018)









Tuesday, 30 January 2018

Mapping Mountains – Hill Reclassifications – Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales


Bryn y Gwynt (SH 599 449) – Dominant addition

There has been an addition to the listing of the Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales due to analysis conducted by Aled Williams of data produced via LIDAR.

The criteria for this listing are:

Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales.  Welsh P30s whose prominence equal or exceed half that of their absolute height.

Prior to analysis of data produced via LIDAR this hill was listed in the Hills to be surveyed sub list that accompanied the Welsh P30 lists published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website.  When these sub lists were standardised and also drop values added, this hill was listed with c 29m of drop based on the 56m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 27m based on contouring at 10m intervals and between 20m – 30m, with the caveat that the 27m spot height that appears on a road at SH 60168 45293 on the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website is not positioned at the critical bwlch.  Therefore without the minimum 30m of drop this hill was not considered for Dominant status.  

The name of the hill is Bryn y Gwynt and it is situated in the Moelwynion range of hills and is placed in the Region of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A1).  The hill is positioned with the A 4085 road to its north-east and has the Welsh Highland Railway to its immediate west and overlooks the Afon Glaslyn also to its west, and has the village of Beddgelert to its north- north-west and the town of Porthmadog to its south south-west.

The hill is a part of Coed Hafod y Llyn, and as this name implies its summit is placed in woodland which is deciduous, and as the summit of the hill is not a part of designated open access land permission to visit should be sought, however paths are indicated on the map to the north, east and south of this hill’s summit and therefore gaining access to its lower slopes has probably been accepted for many years.

The addition of Bryn y Gwynt to Dominant status is due to analysis conducted by Aled Williams of data produced via LIDAR.  The LIDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) technique produced highly accurate height data that is now freely available for much of England and Wales. 

Aled’s analysis of the data produced via LIDAR gives the hill the following details:


Bryn y Gwynt

Summit Height:  58.2m

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 59949 44915

Bwlch Height:  28.0m

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 60222 45248

Drop:  30.2m

Dominance:  51.89%


Therefore, the 58.2m data produced via LIDAR for the summit position at SH 59949 44915 and the 28.0m data produced via LIDAR for the bwlch position at SH 60222 45248 gives this hill 30.2m of drop and 51.89% of Dominance, which is sufficient for its inclusion as a Dominant hill.


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Moelwynion

Name:  Bryn y Gwynt

Dominance:  51.89%

OS 1:50,000 map:  124

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 59949 44915 

Summit Height:  58.2m (data via LIDAR)

Drop Summit to Bwlch:  30.2m (data via LIDAR)

Drop Bwlch to ODN:  28.0m (data via LIDAR)


My thanks to Aled Williams for sending the details of this hill to me.

Myrddyn Phillips (January 2018)


Monday, 29 January 2018

Mapping Mountains – Hill Reclassifications – 30-99m Twmpau


Bryn y Gwynt (SH 599 449) – 30-99m Sub-Twmpau reclassified to 30-99m Twmpau

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the 30-99m Twmpau (thirty welsh metre prominences and upward) due to analysis conducted by Aled Williams of data produced via LIDAR.  The 30-99m Twmpau is the title for the list of Welsh hills at and above 30m and below 100m in height that have a minimum 30m of drop.

Accompanying the main Twmpau list is a sub list entitled the Sub-Twmpau, with this hill being reclassified from the 30-99m Sub-Twmpau category.  The criteria for 30-99m Sub-Twmpau status being all Welsh hills at and above 30m and below 100m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop.

Prior to analysis of data produced via LIDAR this hill was listed in the Hills to be surveyed sub list that accompanied the Welsh P30 lists published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website.  When these sub lists were standardised and also drop values added, this hill was listed with c 29m of drop based on the 56m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 27m based on contouring at 10m intervals and between 20m – 30m, with the caveat that the 27m spot height that appears on a road at SH 60168 45293 on the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website is not positioned at the critical bwlch. 

The name of the hill is Bryn y Gwynt and it is situated in the Moelwynion range of hills and is placed in the Region of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A1).  The hill is positioned with the A 4085 road to its north-east and has the Welsh Highland Railway to its immediate west and overlooks the Afon Glaslyn also to its west, and has the village of Beddgelert to its north- north-west and the town of Porthmadog to its south south-west.

The hill is a part of Coed Hafod y Llyn, and as this name implies its summit is placed in woodland which is deciduous, and as the summit of the hill is not a part of designated open access land permission to visit should be sought, however paths are indicated on the map to the north, east and south of this hill’s summit and therefore gaining access to its lower slopes has probably been accepted for many years.

The reclassification of Bryn y Gwynt to 30-99m Twmpau status is due to analysis conducted by Aled Williams of data produced via LIDAR.  The LIDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) technique produced highly accurate height data that is now freely available for much of England and Wales.  

Aled’s analysis of the data produced via LIDAR gives the hill the following details:


Bryn y Gwynt

Summit Height:  58.2m

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 59949 44915

Bwlch Height:  28.0m

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 60222 45248

Drop:  30.2m


Therefore, the 58.2m data produced via LIDAR for the summit position at SH 59949 44915 and the 28.0m data produced via LIDAR for the bwlch position at SH 60222 45248 gives this hill 30.2m of drop, which is sufficient for its inclusion as a 30-99m Twmpau.


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Moelwynion

Summit Height:  58.2m (data via LIDAR)

Name:  Bryn y Gwynt

OS 1:50,000 map:  124

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 59949 44915 
  
Drop:  30.2m (data via LIDAR)


My thanks to Aled Williams for sending the details of this hill to me


Myrddyn Phillips (January 2018)

Sunday, 28 January 2018

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – The Fours


Burway Hill (SO 440 942)

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the height, drop and status of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 19th February 2014.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop.  The criteria for 400m Sub-Four status are all English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 20m and more and below 30m of drop.
  
The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being the Stiperstones (SO 367 986).  The hill is a part of the Long Mynd and is positioned above the Carding Mill Valley to its north and the Townbrook Valley to its south, and has the town of Church Stretton to its east.

Burway Hill (SO 440 942)

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Devil’s Mouth, this was also the name it appeared as when the list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as Burway Hill in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013.


Devil's Mouth        400c        SO 441 942        Two points of same height







During my early hill listing I paid little regard to name placement on a map, or the meaning of names and to what feature the name was appropriately applied to, and used many names that seemingly applied to a hill and whose placement was nearest the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  Therefore I prioritised names for listing purposes that I now understand are inappropriate or where another name is viewed as being more appropriate, and Devil’s Mouth is such an example as this name has been consistently applied by the Ordnance Survey on maps that are viewed as being good for name placement such as the Six-Inch series and the 1:25,000 Historical map, to land immediately above the Devilsmouth Hollow which is a steep stream valley to the north-east of this hill, with the Devil’s Mouth the narrow neck of land where an ancient cross-dyke is situated with Burway Hill to the east of this point and the main Long Mynd plateau to the west.   

Extract from the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Burway Hill and this was derived from historical Ordnance Survey maps. 


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Stiperstones

Name:  Burway Hill

Previously Listed Name:  Devil’s Mouth 

Summit Height:  402.8m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 44061 94220 
 
Drop:  29.7m (converted to OSGM15)


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Burway Hill (SO 440 942)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (January 2018)








Saturday, 27 January 2018

Mapping Mountains – Summit Relocations – 30-99m Twmpau and Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales


Bryn Tŵr (SH 604 441)

There has been a Summit Relocation to a hill listed in the 30-99m Twmpau and Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales which was initiated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 23rd December 2017 in wet conditions but with clear visibility.

The criteria for the two lists this height revision affects are:

30-99m Twmpau – Welsh hills at and above 30m and below 100m in height that have 30m minimum drop.  With the word Twmpau being an acronym standing for ‘thirty welsh metre prominences and upward’.

Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales - Welsh P30s whose prominence equal or exceed half that of their absolute height.

The name of the hill is Bryn Tŵr and it is placed in the Moelwynion range of hills which are situated in the north-western part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A1), and the hill is positioned overlooking the A 4085 road and the Nanmor to its east, with it being positioned between the village of Beddgelert to its north north-west and Porthmadog to its south south-west. 

Bryn Tŵr (SH 60453 44187)

As the summit of the hill is not on designated open access land permission to visit should be sought, however the hill has a well-used path leading to its summit indicating that people have visited this hill for many years.

The hill’s summit position was previously given as SH 60493 44178, this is where the 52m spot height appears on the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website.  This spot height appears in an uppermost 50m ring contour, whilst the position of the 54.5m (converted to OSGM15) summit is outside of this ring contour which is probably due to the cartographer having difficulty with the tree cover.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website

Therefore, the position of the relocated summit is at SH 60453 44187 and is ground at the base of a slate chair dedicated to Rhys Goch; a 15th century bard who lived at Hafod Garegog, near Beddgelert.  This position is within the 40m ring contour shown on Ordnance Survey maps and no spot height is given to it, the relocated summit is approximately 50 metres east from where the previously listed summit is positioned.


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Moelwynion

Summit Height:  54.5m (converted to OSGM15)

Name:  Bryn Tŵr

OS 1:50,000 map:  124

Summit Grid Reference (New Position):  SH 60453 44187

Drop:  c 43m

Dominance:  77.99%

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Bryn Tŵr


Myrddyn Phillips (January 2018)








Friday, 26 January 2018

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – The Fours


Cowpe Moss (SD 834 193)

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the summit height of the hill having been determined by a Leica 530 survey conducted by John Barnard, Graham Jackson and Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 8th July 2009.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Southern Pennines and is placed in Region 36, and is a Cardinal Hill.  The hill is positioned above a number of A roads with the A 681 to its north, the A 680 to its south-west and the A 671 to its east, and has the towns of Rawtenstall and Bacup to the north-west and north-east respectively and Rochdale to the south-east.

Cowpe Moss (SD 834 193)

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Cowpe Moss, the name was then given as Hailstorm Hill (Cowpe Moss) when this list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as Hailstorm Hill in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013.  The hill is now reverting to its original listed name for the 2nd edition of The Fours published by Mapping Mountains Publications.


477m        Hail Storm Hill (143)       109        SD 834 193        244m






Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Cowpe Moss and this was derived from contemporary Ordnance Survey maps. 

Gathering data at the summit of Cowpe Moss


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Southern Pennines

Name:  Cowpe Moss

Previously Listed Name:  Hailstorm Hill 

Summit Height:  476.7m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  109

Summit Grid Reference:  SD 83497 19346  

Drop:  244m


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (January 2018)




Thursday, 25 January 2018

Mapping Mountains – Significant Height Revisions – 30-99m Twmpau and Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales


Bryn Tŵr (SH 604 441)

There has been a Significant Height Revision to a hill that is listed in the 30-99m Twmpau and Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales, and which was initiated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 23rd December 2017 in wet conditions but with clear visibility.

The criteria for the two lists this height revision affects are:

30-99m Twmpau – Welsh hills at and above 30m and below 100m in height that have 30m minimum drop.  With the word Twmpau being an acronym standing for ‘thirty welsh metre prominences and upward’.

Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales - Welsh P30s whose prominence equal or exceed half that of their absolute height.

The name of the hill is Bryn Tŵr and it is placed in the Moelwynion range of hills which are situated in the north-western part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A1), and the hill is positioned overlooking the A 4085 road and the Nanmor to its east, with it being positioned between the village of Beddgelert to its north north-west and Porthmadog to its south south-west. 

As the summit of the hill is not on designated open access land permission to visit should be sought, however the hill has a well-used path leading to its summit indicating that people have visited this hill for many years.

Prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 this hill was listed with c 40m of drop and 76.92% Dominance based on the 52m spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website and an estimated bwlch height of c 12m based on contouring between 10m – 20m.  The summit height produced by the Trimble survey is 54.5m (converted to OSGM15) with its position to the west of where the 52m spot height appears and outside of the uppermost 50m ring contour on Ordnance Survey maps, with this summit height coming within the parameters of the Significant Height Revisions used within this page heading, these parameters are:

The term Significant Height Revisions applies to any listed hill whose Ordnance Survey or Harvey map summit spot height has a 2m or more discrepancy when compared to the survey result produced by the Trimble GeoXH 6000, or a previous estimated summit height based on interpolation of contours.  Also included are hills whose summit map data is missing an uppermost ring contour when compared to the data produced by the Trimble.  As heights on different scaled Ordnance Survey maps are not consistent the height given on the 1:25,000 Explorer map is being prioritised in favour of the 1:50,000 Landranger map for detailing these revisions.

Therefore, this hill’s new summit height is 54.5m (converted to OSGM15) which is 2.5m higher than its previously listed height of 52m and 14.5m higher than the uppermost 40m ring contour on Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer maps.


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Moelwynion

Summit Height (New Height):  54.5m (converted to OSGM15)

Name:  Bryn Tŵr

OS 1:50,000 map:  124

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 60453 44187

Drop:  c 43m

Dominance:  77.99%


Gathering data from the summit of Bryn Tŵr which resulted in this hill's significant height revision


Myrddyn Phillips (January 2018)