Thursday, 26 May 2022

Mapping Mountains – Trimble Surveys – Brown Clee Hill

 

05.04.22  Church Hill (SO 710 731)

LIDAR image of Church Hill (SO 710 731)

Church Hill was the first summit survey of the day during a planned five hill mini expedition, with the priority being a survey of Abberley Hill (SO 751 672).  For Abberley Hill we wanted to survey its summit and col and also investigate the disused rail cutting positioned below a road bridge, with the latter currently constituting the height and position of its col.

I was out with Charles Everett for the day, who had petitioned me for a number of years to survey Abberley Hill.  The onset of Covid-19 and its resulting restrictions over the last two years had limited our intention to visit this area.  But with restrictions now lifted we set off from Welshpool heading south.  The weather forecast was set fine for the day and importantly with it being the start of spring, few leaves would be on the trees to interfere with satellite reception for the survey equipment.

Before visiting the summit of Church Hill we surveyed and assessed the Abberley Hill col.  We then headed a mile or so farther south and parked next to a telephone kiosk in the small community of Bayton Common giving us easy access to Church Hill, with its summit rising just to the north.

Church Hill is one of a number of P30s situated between the small town of Cleobury Mortimer to its north-west and the city of Worcester to its south-east, and it was the northerly part of this land that we concentrated on for our bagging and surveying exploits of the day.

From our starting point the upper hill could just be seen as a few scattered grazing fields peering over a rogue house or two.  Because of this the hill gave a rather none-descript impression from this direction.  However, there are many such hills of similar height that give the same first impression, and upon visiting them, each in turn have a quality that is worth investigating.

The ascent of the hill was pleasant enough, as we made our way up the road which I had just driven down and headed on to the hill via a gate on our left.  Beyond the gate the ground rose leading up toward a barb wired fence with the summit triangulation pillar beyond. 

Charles approaching the summit of Church Hill

A cooling breeze blew across the upper hill as we made our way to its high point.  As we arrived on top we soon got to work; me assessing the lay of land for the summit position and Trimble placement, and Charles taking a cast of the flush bracket attached to the trig pillar. 

Gathering data at the summit of Church Hill

Having chosen the spot for Trimble placement I set the equipment up to gather its first summit data set of the day and then walked over to join Charles, who was relaxing lying on the grass, he was positively chilled out with an expansive view as backdrop. 

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 set-up position at the summit of Church Hill

Once five minutes of data were gathered and stored I closed the equipment down, took a few photographs, packed the Trimble away and we then headed down following or inward route back to my awaiting car. 

 

Survey Result: 

 

Church Hill

Summit Height:  229.9m (converted to OSGM15, Trimble GeoXH 6000)

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 71032 73113 (Trimble GeoXH 6000)

Col Height:  198.0m (LIDAR)

Col Grid Reference:  SO 71034 72470 (LIDAR)

Drop:  31.9m (Trimble GeoXH 6000 summit and LIDAR col)

Dominance:  13.88% (Trimble GeoXH 6000 summit and LIDAR col)

 

 

For further details please consult the Trimble Survey Spreadsheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, 25 May 2022

Mapping Mountains – Summit Relocations – Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales and Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales


Lan Ddu Cilwenau (SN 572 371) 

There has been a Summit Relocation to a hill that is listed in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales and Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales, with the summit height, bwlch height and their locations, the drop, dominance and status of the hill derived from detail on contemporary maps produced from Ordnance Survey data and LIDAR analysis conducted by Myrddyn Phillips. 

LIDAR image of Lan Ddu Cilwenau (SN 572 371)

The criteria for the two listings that this summit relocation applies to are:

Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales – Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height that have 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the Sub-Trichant, with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips with the Introduction to the list and the renaming of it appearing on Mapping Mountains on the 13th May 2017, and the Introduction to the Mapping Mountains publication of the list appearing on the 1st January 2022. 

Y Trichant - The 300m Hills of Wales by Myrddyn Phillips

Y Trechol – The Dominant Hills of Wales – Welsh P30 hills whose prominence equal or exceed half that of their absolute height.  With the criteria for Lesser Dominant status being those additional Welsh P30 hills whose prominence is between one third and half that of their absolute height.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips with the Introduction to the start of the Mapping Mountains publication of this list appearing on the 3rd December 2015, and the list is now available in its entirety on Mapping Mountains in Google Doc format. 

Y Trechol - The Dominant Hills of Wales by Myrddyn Phillips

The name the hill is listed by is Lan Ddu Cilwenau, and it is adjoined to the Mynydd Pencarreg group of hills, which are situated in the south-western part of South Wales (Region B, Sub-Region B1), and it is positioned with the B4337 road to its north-east, a minor road to its south-west and the B4310 road to its south-east, and has the village of Llansawel towards the east south-east.

When the original Welsh 300m P30 list was published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website, this hill was listed with a 328m summit height, based on the spot height that is positioned at SN 57642 37049 and appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

However, it was not until LIDAR became available that the details for this hill could be accurately re-assessed.  The LIDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) technique produced highly accurate height data that is now freely available for much of England and Wales. 

LIDAR summit image of Lan Ddu Cilwenau (SN 572 371)

The summit height produced by LIDAR analysis is 333.1m and is positioned at SN 57277 37147, and this comes within the parameters of the Summit Relocations used within this page heading, these parameters are:

The term Summit Relocations applies when the high point of the hill is found to be positioned; in a different field, to a different feature such as in a conifer plantation,  within a different map contour, to a different point where a number of potential summit positions are within close proximity, when natural ground or the natural and intact summit of a hill is confirmed compared to a higher point such as a raised field boundary or covered reservoir that is judged to be a relatively recent man-made construct, or a relocation of approximately 100 metres or more in distance from either the position of a map spot height or from where the summit of the hill was previously thought to exist.

Therefore, the summit height produced by LIDAR analysis is 333.1m and is positioned at SN 57277 37147, this position is not given a spot height on the contemporary Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map, and is approximately 400 metres eastward from where the previously listed summit is positioned. 

 

The full details for the hill are: 

Group:  Mynydd Pencarreg 

Name:  Lan Ddu Cilwenau 

OS 1:50,000 map:  146

Summit Height:  333.1m (LIDAR) 

Summit Grid Reference (New Position):  SN 57277 37147 (LIDAR) 

Bwlch Height:  c 211m (interpolation) 

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SN 56467 37617 (interpolation) 

Drop:  c 122m (LIDAR summit and interpolated bwlch) 

Dominance:  36.66% (LIDAR summit and interpolated bwlch) 

 

Myrddyn Phillips (May 2022)

 

  

Tuesday, 24 May 2022

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales

 

Ffridd Cae Penfras (SJ 007 146) 

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales, with the summit height, bwlch height and their locations, the drop and status of the hill derived from detail on contemporary maps produced from Ordnance Survey data. 

LIDAR part image of Ffridd Cae Penfras (SJ 007 146)

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales – Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height that have 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the Sub-Trichant, with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips with the Introduction to the list and the renaming of it appearing on Mapping Mountains on the 13th May 2017, and the Introduction to the Mapping Mountains publication of the list appearing on the 1st January 2022. 

Y Trichant - The 300m Hills of Wales by Myrddyn Phillips

The hill is adjoined to the Esgeiriau Gwynion group of hills, which are situated in the southern part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A3), and it is positioned with a minor road to its north and south-west, the A458 road to its south and the B4395 road to its east, and has the village of Llangadfan towards the south.

The hill appeared in the original Welsh 300m P30 list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website, under the transposed name of Pren Croes, which is a prominent name that appears to the south of the summit of this hill on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map.


Pren Croes368mSJ008146125239

 

During my early hill listing I paid little regard to name placement on the map, or the meaning of names and to what feature the name was appropriately applied to.  Therefore, I prioritised names for listing purposes that I now understand are either inappropriate or where another name is viewed as being more appropriate.

This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historic documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

As the summit of this hill comprises bounded land the details for it were examined on the Tithe map.  The term Tithe map is generally given to a map of a Welsh or English parish or township and which was prepared after the 1836 Tithe Commutation Act.  This act allowed tithes to be paid in cash rather than goods.  The Tithe maps gave names of owners and occupiers of land in each parish and importantly for place-name research they also included the name of enclosed land.  This enclosed land is usually based on a field system, however not every field is given a name, but many are and especially so in Wales. 

Extract from the Tithe map

The enclosed land where the summit of this hill is situated is given the number 303 on the Tithe map, this can be cross referenced against the apportionments; it is these apportionments that give the name of the owner or occupier of the land as well as the name of the land.  The land where the summit of this hill is situated is named as Ffridd Cae Penfras in the apportionments, with the details on the Tithe map appearing in the parish of Llangadfan and in the county named as Montgomery. 

Extract from the apportionments

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales is Ffridd Cae Penfras and this was derived from the Tithe map, which substantiates its use on the contemporary Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map. 

 

The full details for the hill are: 

Group:  Esgeiriau Gwynion 

Name:  Ffridd Cae Penfras 

Previously Listed Name:  Pren Croes 

OS 1:50,000 map:  125 

Summit Height:  368m (spot height)                                                           

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 00728 14605 (hand-held GPS via DoBIH) 

Bwlch Height:  c 318m (interpolation) 

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SJ 00178 14557 (interpolation) 

Drop:  c 50m (spot height summit and interpolated bwlch) 

 

Myrddyn Phillips (May 2022)

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, 23 May 2022

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales

 

Banc Garreg Winau (SN 562 414) 

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales, with the summit height, bwlch height and their locations, the drop and status of the hill derived from detail on contemporary maps produced from Ordnance Survey data. 

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are: 

Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales – Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height that have 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the Sub-Trichant, with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips with the Introduction to the list and the renaming of it appearing on Mapping Mountains on the 13th May 2017, and the Introduction to the Mapping Mountains publication of the list appearing on the 1st January 2022. 

Y Trichant - The 300m Hills of Wales by Myrddyn Phillips

The hill is adjoined to the Mynydd Pencarreg group of hills, which are situated in the south-western part of South Wales (Region B, Sub-Region B1), and it is positioned with a minor road to its east and the B4337 road to its south-west, and has the town of Llanybydder towards the north-west. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

The hill appeared in the original Welsh 300m P30 list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website, under the transposed name of Llwyndrissi, with an accompanying note stating; aka Banc Garregwinau.  With the prioritised name appearing near the summit of this hill on the contemporary Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map.


Llwyndrissi369mSN562414146186Included by contour configuration. aka Banc Garregwinau

 

Since the original publication of the Welsh P30 lists on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website there have been a number of maps made available online.  Some of these are historic such as the series of Six-Inch maps on the National Library of Scotland website.  Whilst others were digitally updated such as the Ordnance Survey Vector Map Local that was hosted on the Geograph website and which was entitled the Interactive Coverage Map, whilst others are current and digitally updated such as the interactive mapping on the Magic Maps and WalkLakes websites, and it is the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps that give the name of Banc Garreg Winau near the summit of this hill complimenting its position on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales is Banc Garreg Winau, and this was derived from the contemporary Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map with the name placement substantiated by the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps. 

 

The full details for the hill are: 

Group:  Mynydd Pencarreg 

Name:  Banc Garreg Winau 

Previously Listed Name:  Llwyndrissi 

OS 1:50,000 map:  146

Summit Height:  369m (spot height)                                                           

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 56242 41456 (hand-held GPS via DoBIH) 

Bwlch Height:  338m (spot height) 

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SN 56765 41224 (spot height) 

Drop:  31m (spot height summit and bwlch) 

 

Myrddyn Phillips (May 2022)

 

 

 

Sunday, 22 May 2022

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales


Foel Fain (SH 983 124) 

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales, with the summit height, bwlch height and their locations, the drop and status of the hill derived from LIDAR analysis conducted by Myrddyn Phillips. 

LIDAR image of Foel Fain (SH 983 124)

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales – Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height that have 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the Sub-Trichant, with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips with the Introduction to the list and the renaming of it appearing on Mapping Mountains on the 13th May 2017, and the Introduction to the Mapping Mountains publication of the list appearing on the 1st January 2022. 

Y Trichant - The 300m Hills of Wales by Myrddyn Phillips

The hill is adjoined to the Esgeiriau Gwynion group of hills, which are situated in the southern part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A3), and it is positioned with a minor road to its north and east and the A458 road to its south, and has the village of Llangadfan towards the south-east.

The hill appeared in the original Welsh 300m P30 list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website, under the directional name of Y Fron East Top, with an accompanying note stating; Name from hill to the West.


Y Fron East Top320mSH983124125239Name from hill to the West.

 

During my early hill listing I thought it appropriate to either invent a name for a hill, or use a name that appeared near to the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  My preference was to use farm names and put Pen, Bryn or Moel in front of them or as in this instance use a directional name based on supplanting the name of a near hill and adding a directional component to it.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historic documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

Since the original publication of the Welsh P30 lists on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website there have been a number of maps made available online.  Some of these are historic such as the series of Six-Inch maps on the National Library of Scotland website.  Whilst others were digitally updated such as the Ordnance Survey Vector Map Local that was hosted on the Geograph website and which was entitled the Interactive Coverage Map, whilst others are current and digitally updated such as the interactive mapping on the Magic Maps and WalkLakes websites.

The details for this hill were re-assessed when the Ordnance Survey Vector Map Local hosted on the Geograph website and which was entitled the Interactive Coverage Map became available online.  This mapping had the name of Foel Fain positioned close to the summit of this hill.

Another of the mapping resources now available online is the Magic Maps website which hosts an interactive map originated from Ordnance Survey data.  This mapping also shows the name of Foel Fain positioned close to the summit of this hill. 

Extract from the Magic Maps website

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales is Foel Fain and this was derived from Ordnance Survey Vector Map Local hosted on the Geograph website and which was entitled the Interactive Coverage Map. 

 

The full details for the hill are: 

Group:  Esgeiriau Gwynion 

Name:  Foel Fain 

Previously Listed Name:  Y Fron East Top 

OS 1:50,000 map:  125 

Summit Height:  319.8m (LIDAR)                                                           

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 98313 12471 (LIDAR) 

Bwlch Height:  299.1m (LIDAR) 

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 98122 12507 & SH 98106 12503 (LIDAR) 

Drop:  20.7m (LIDAR) 

 

Myrddyn Phillips (May 2022)