Tuesday, 3 August 2021

Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - Y Trichant

 

Y Trichant – Significant Name Changes


Y Trichant are the Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 40om in height that have a minimum drop of 30m, with these hills forming the 300m height band within the listing of the Twmpau (thirty welsh metre prominences and upward).  Accompanying the main P30 list is a sub list entitled the 300m Sub-Trichant with the qualification to this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop, with the Introduction to the re-naming of this list and its publication history appearing on Mapping Mountains on 13.05.17.

The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips and the posts that have appeared on Mapping Mountains detailing the significant name changes to the main P30 list and the sub list appear below presented chronologically in receding order.








Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - Y Trichant

Thirteen Acres (SO 161 725) - 107th significant name change

Survey post for Thirteen Acres

 

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Waleswith the summit height, bwlch height and their locations, the drop and status of the hill confirmed by LIDAR analysis and a subsequent Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips. 

LIDAR image of Thirteen Acres (SO 161 725)

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are: 

Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales.  Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height that have 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the Sub-Trichant with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips, with the Introduction to the list and the renaming of it appearing on Mapping Mountains on the 13th May 2017. 

Y Trichant - The 300m Hills of Wales by Myrddyn Phillips

The hill is adjoined to the Beacon Hill group of hills, which are situated in Mid and West Wales (Region B, Sub-Region B1), and it is positioned with the B4356 road to its north-east and minor roads to its west and south-east, and has the village of Llanbister towards the west. 

The hill appeared in the original 300m Welsh P30list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website under the invented and transposed name of Cantal Hill, with an accompanying note stating; Name from hall & wood to the West.


Cantal Hill380cSO161725136/148200/214Name from hall & wood to the West

 

During my early hill listing I thought it appropriate to either invent a name for a hill, or use a name that appeared near to the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  My preference was to use farm names and put PenBryn or Moel in front of them or as in this instance transpose the name of a hall and wood and add the word Hill to it.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historic documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

Before visiting this hill I called at Park Farm (SO 160 718) where I met Matthew Williams.  We chatted in the early morning sunshine for quite some time and Matthew told me that he had lived at this farm all of his life with his grandfather having rented it from 1963, and the farm and accompanying land was then bought in 2011.  Therefore, Matthew owns the land where the summit of this hill is situated and having explained my interest in upland place-names and in particular the name of the hill above Matthew’s Farm, he said that he had never heard an individual name for the hill, I then asked about the field where the summit is situated.  He knew exactly where the high point was and directed me from his farm up the continuation of the track, across a number of fields to the summit; he then told me the field where the high point is situated is known as Thirteen Acres.  Thanking Matthew, I asked permission to visit and survey the summit and this was duly given. 

Matthew Williams of Park Farm

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in the Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales is Thirteen Acres and this was derived from local enquiry. 

 

The full details for the hill are: 

Group:  Beacon Hill 

Name:  Thirteen Acres 

Previously Listed Name:  Cantal Hill 

OS 1:50,000 map:  136, 148

Summit Height:  381.4m (converted to OSGM15, Trimble GeoXH 6000)                                                          

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 16129 72592 (Trimble GeoXH 6000) 

Bwlch Height:  c 319m (interpolation) 

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SO 17072 72823 (interpolation) 

Drop:  c 62m (Trimble GeoXH 6000 summit and interpolated bwlch) 

 

Myrddyn Phillips (August 2021)

 

 


Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - Y Trichant

Foel Dryll (SH 942 379) - 106th significant name change

Hill Reclassifications post for Foel Dryll

 

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Waleswith the summit height, bwlch height and their locations, the drop and status of the hill derived from detail on contemporary maps produced from Ordnance Survey data. 

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are: 

Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales.  Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height that have 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the Sub-Trichant with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips, with the Introduction to the list and the renaming of it appearing on Mapping Mountains on the 13th May 2017. 

Y Trichant - The 300m Hills of Wales by Myrddyn Phillips

The hill is adjoined to the Arenig group of hills, which are situated in the central part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A3), and it is positioned with the A4212 road to its west and the A494 road to its south, and has the town of Y Bala towards the south-west. 

When the original 300m height band of Welsh P30 hills were published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website this hill was not included in the Hills to be surveyed sub list, as it was considered not to meet the criteria then used for this sub category. 

After the sub list was standardised, and interpolated heights and drop values also included the details for this hill were re-evaluated and it was listed under the name of Coed Foel-Dryll, which is a prominent name that appears near the summit of this hill on the contemporary Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

During my early hill listing I paid little regard to name placement on the map, or the meaning of names and to what feature the name was appropriately applied to.  Therefore, I prioritised names for listing purposes that I now understand are either inappropriate or where another name is viewed as being more appropriate. 

Since publication of these P30 lists on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website there have been a number of Ordnance Survey maps made available online, some of these are historic such as the series of Six-Inch maps on the National Library of Scotland website, whilst others are current and digitally updated such as the Vector Map Local hosted on the Geograph website and which was entitled the Interactive Coverage Map, and the interactive mapping on the Magic Maps and WalkLakes websites, and it is the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps that give the name of Foel Dryll for this hill. 

Extract from the Ordnance Surveys series of Six-Inch maps

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in the Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales is Foel Dryll and this was derived from the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps. 

 

The full details for the hill are: 

Group:  Arenig 

Name:  Foel Dryll 

Previously Listed Name:  Coed Foel-Dryll 

OS 1:50,000 map:  125

Summit Height:  345m (spot height)                                                           

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 94261 37960 (spot height) 

Bwlch Height:  c 324m (interpolation) 

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 94339 38162 (interpolation) 

Drop:  c 21m (spot height summit and interpolated bwlch) 

 

Myrddyn Phillips (July 2021)

 




Monday, 2 August 2021

Mapping Mountains – Summit Relocations – 30-99m Twmpau

 

Pen y Graig Wen (SH 446 879) 

There has been a Summit Relocation to a hill that is listed in the 30-99m Twmpau, with the summit height, bwlch height and their locations, the drop and status of the hill derived from LIDAR analysis conducted by Myrddyn Phillips. 

LIDAR image of Pen y Graig Wen (SH 446 879)

The criteria for the list that this summit relocation applies to are:

30-99m Twmpau - Welsh hills at or above 30m and below 100m in height with 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the 30-99m Sub-Twmpau with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 30m and below 100m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop, with the word Twmpau being an acronym standing for thirty welsh metre prominences and upward. 

The 30-99m Twmpau by Myrddyn Phillips

The name the hill is listed by is Pen y Graig Wen and this was derived from the Tithe map and it is adjoined to the Ynys Môn group of hills, which are situated in the north-western part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A1), and it is positioned with the coast to its east, minor roads to its north, south and east and the B5111 road to its west, and has the village of Rhos-y-bol towards the west north-west. 

When the original 30-99m height band of Welsh P30 hills were published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website this hill was not included in the Hills to be surveyed sub list, as it was considered not to meet the criteria then used for this sub category. 

After the sub list was standardised, and interpolated heights and drop values also included the details for this hill were re-evaluated and it was listed with an estimated c 24m of drop, based on an estimated c 92m summit height positioned at SH 44769 87804 and an estimated c 68m bwlch height, with both heights based on interpolation of 5m contouring that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

However, it was not until LIDAR became available that the details for this hill could be accurately re-assessed.  The LIDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) technique produced highly accurate height data that is now freely available for much of England and Wales. 

The summit height produced by LIDAR analysis is 94.3m and is positioned at SH 44637 87986, and this comes within the parameters of the Summit Relocations used within this page heading, these parameters are: 

The term Summit Relocations applies when the hill’s high point is found to be positioned; in a different field, to a different feature such as in a conifer plantation, placed within a different map contour, to a different point where a number of potential summit positions are within close proximity, or when natural ground or the natural and intact summit of a hill is confirmed compared to a higher point such as a raised field boundary that is judged to be a relatively recent man-made construct, or a relocation of approximately 100 metres or more in distance from either the position of a map spot height or from where the summit of the hill was previously thought to exist. 

Therefore, the summit height produced by LIDAR analysis is 94.3m and this is positioned at SH 44637 87986, this position is not given a spot height on contemporary Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer maps, and is approximately 225 metres north-westward from where the previously listed summit is positioned. 

 

The full details for the hill are: 

Group:  Ynys Môn 

Name:  Pen y Graig Wen 

OS 1:50,000 map:  114

Summit Height:  94.3m (LIDAR) 

Summit Grid Reference (New Position):  SH 44637 87986 (LIDAR) 

Bwlch Height:  68.2m (LIDAR) 

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 45162 88579 (LIDAR) 

Drop:  26.1m (LIDAR) 

 

Myrddyn Phillips (August 2021)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales

 

Thirteen Acres (SO 161 725) 

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales, with the summit height, bwlch height and their locations, the drop and status of the hill confirmed by LIDAR analysis and a subsequent Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips. 

LIDAR image of Thirteen Acres (SO 161 725)

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are: 

Y Trichant The 300m Hills of Wales.  Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height that have 30m minimum drop, with an accompanying sub list entitled the Sub-Trichant with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills at or above 300m and below 400m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips, with the Introduction to the list and the renaming of it appearing on Mapping Mountains on the 13th May 2017. 

Y Trichant - The 300m Hills of Wales by Myrddyn Phillips

The hill is adjoined to the Beacon Hill group of hills, which are situated in Mid and West Wales (Region B, Sub-Region B1), and it is positioned with the B4356 road to its north-east and minor roads to its west and south-east, and has the village of Llanbister towards the west. 

The hill appeared in the original 300m Welsh P30list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website under the invented and transposed name of Cantal Hill, with an accompanying note stating; Name from hall & wood to the West.


Cantal Hill380cSO161725136/148200/214Name from hall & wood to the West

 

During my early hill listing I thought it appropriate to either invent a name for a hill, or use a name that appeared near to the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  My preference was to use farm names and put Pen, Bryn or Moel in front of them or as in this instance transpose the name of a hall and wood and add the word Hill to it.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historic documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

Before visiting this hill I called at Park Farm (SO 160 718) where I met Matthew Williams.  We chatted in the early morning sunshine for quite some time and Matthew told me that he had lived at this farm all of his life with his grandfather having rented it from 1963, and the farm and accompanying land was then bought in 2011.  Therefore, Matthew owns the land where the summit of this hill is situated and having explained my interest in upland place-names and in particular the name of the hill above Matthew’s Farm, he said that he had never heard an individual name for the hill, I then asked about the field where the summit is situated.  He knew exactly where the high point was and directed me from his farm up the continuation of the track, across a number of fields to the summit; he then told me the field where the high point is situated is known as Thirteen Acres.  Thanking Matthew, I asked permission to visit and survey the summit and this was duly given. 

Matthew Williams of Park Farm

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in the Y Trichant – The 300m Hills of Wales is Thirteen Acres and this was derived from local enquiry. 

 

The full details for the hill are: 

Group:  Beacon Hill 

Name:  Thirteen Acres 

Previously Listed Name:  Cantal Hill 

OS 1:50,000 map:  136, 148

Summit Height:  381.4m (converted to OSGM15, Trimble GeoXH 6000)                                                          

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 16129 72592 (Trimble GeoXH 6000) 

Bwlch Height:  c 319m (interpolation) 

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SO 17072 72823 (interpolation) 

Drop:  c 62m (Trimble GeoXH 6000 summit and interpolated bwlch) 

 

Myrddyn Phillips (August 2021)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, 1 August 2021

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – The Welsh P15s

 

Nant y Frân (SH 389 923) 

There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Welsh P15s, with the summit height, bwlch height and their locations, the drop and status of the hill derived from LIDAR analysis conducted by Myrddyn Phillips. 

LIDAR image of Nant y Frân (SH 389 923)

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Welsh P15s – Welsh hills with 15m minimum drop, irrespective of their height, with an accompanying sub list entitled the Welsh Sub-P15s, with the criteria for this sub category being all Welsh hills with 14m or more and below 15m of drop.  The list is authored by Myrddyn Phillips, with the Introduction to the list appearing on Mapping Mountains on the 10th May 2019. 

The Welsh P15s by Myrddyn Phillips

The hill is adjoined to the Ynys Môn group of hills, which are situated in the north-western part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A1), and it is positioned with the coast and the A5025 road to its north, minor roads to its west, south and east, and has the village of Cemaes towards the west north-west. 

When the listing that became known as The Welsh P15s was being compiled, this hill was listed under the point (Pt. 49m) notation with 15m of drop, based on the 49m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map and the 34m bwlch spot height that appeared on the Ordnance Survey Vector Map Local hosted on the Geograph website and which was entitled the Interactive Coverage Map. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

As the summit of this hill comprises bounded land the details for it were examined on the Tithe map.  The term Tithe map is generally given to a map of a Welsh or English parish or township and which was prepared after the 1836 Tithe Commutation Act.  This act allowed tithes to be paid in cash rather than goods.  The Tithe maps gave names of owners and occupiers of land in each parish and importantly for place-name research they also included the name of enclosed land.  This enclosed land is usually based on a field system, however not every field is given a name, but many are and especially so in Wales. 

Extract from the Tithe map

The enclosed land where the summit of this hill is situated is given the number 43 on the Tithe map, this can be cross referenced against the apportionments; it is these apportionments that give the name of the owner or occupier of the land as well as the name of the land.  The land where the summit of this hill is situated is named as Nant y Frân in the apportionments, with the details on the Tithe map appearing in the parish of Llanbadrig and in the county named as Anglesey. 

Extract from the apportionments

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Welsh P15s is Nant y Frân and this was derived from the Tithe map. 

 

The full details for the hill are: 

Group:  Ynys Môn 

Name:  Nant y Frân

Previously Listed Name:  Pt. 49m 

OS 1:50,000 map:  114

Summit Height:  49.4m (LIDAR)                                                           

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 38928 92356 (LIDAR) 

Bwlch Height:  34.7m (LIDAR) 

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 38859 92572 (LIDAR) 

Drop:  14.7m (LIDAR) 

 

Myrddyn Phillips (August 2021)