Saturday, 24 February 2018

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – The Fours


The Fours – Significant Name Changes

The Fours are the English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have a minimum drop of 30m.  Accompanying the main P30 list are three sub lists; these are the 400m Sub-Four, 390m Sub-Four and 390m Double Sub-Four category’s, with their criteria detailed in the respective Change Registers that are linked in their above titles, with the Introduction to this list being published on Mapping Mountains on the 22nd December 2013.

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams and the posts that have appeared on Mapping Mountains detailing the significant name changes to the main P30 list and the sub lists appear below presented chronologically in receding order.









Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Pt. 489m (NY 487 164) - 12th significant name change


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with this being announced when the 2nd edition of The Fours was published by Mapping Mountains Publications on the 24th April 2018.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list published by Mapping Mountains Publications and by Haroldstreet on the 24th April 2018.

The hill is situated in the Eastern Fells of the Lake District and is placed in Region 34, Section 34C with its Cardinal Hill being High Street (NY 440 110).  The hill is positioned with the expanse of Haweswater Reservoir to its south, and has the small community of Bampton towards the north-east.

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Bampton Common, this was also the name it appeared as when the list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as Bampton Fell in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013. 

When a hill is seemingly unnamed on the map, hill list compilers are prone to either invent a name for the hill or follow the name given the hill in previous hill listings with little consideration for the name’s local or historical confirmation.  This is not a practice that is now advocated as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found, and if a name is not forthcoming the point (Pt. 489m) notation can be used.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

Prior to publication of the 2nd edition of The Fours enquiries were made with two well-known Lake District guide book authors, resulting in the following ‘this top also carries no known local name’, and the advice that ‘one would need to talk to genuine locals and shepherds to give definitive answers’. 

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Pt. 489m and this follows the standard practice of using the point notation for hill’s whose name has not been substantiated by the authors either through local enquiry, contemporary maps or from historical documentation. 

  
The full details for the hill are:

Group:  High Street

Name:  Pt. 489m

Previously Listed Name:  Bampton Fell

Summit Height:  489m

OS 1:50,000 map:  90

Summit Grid Reference:  NY 48712 16476  

Drop:  35m


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (May 2018)







Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Pt. 424m (NY 424 233) - 11th significant name change


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with this being announced when the 2nd edition of The Fours was published by Mapping Mountains Publications on the 24th April 2018.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list published by Mapping Mountains Publications and by Haroldstreet on the 24th April 2018.

The hill is situated in the Eastern Fells of the Lake District and is placed in Region 34, Section 34C with its Cardinal Hill being Helvellyn (NY 342 151).  The hill is positioned between the A 5091 road to its west and the A 592 road to its east and has a minor road directly to its north, and has the small community of Watermillock towards the east south-east.

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Underwood, this was also the name it appeared as when the list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as Watermillock Fell in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013. 

Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of this hill the name of Underwood has been consistently applied to a feature or a house to the east of the hill.  This form of supplanting a name is not a practice that is now advocated as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

Prior to publication of the 2nd edition of The Fours enquiries were made with two well-known Lake District guide book authors, resulting in this hill being described as ‘nameless’, and the advice that ‘one would need to talk to genuine locals and shepherds to give definitive answers’. 

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Pt. 424m and this follows the standard practice of using the point notation for hill’s whose name has not been substantiated by the authors either through local enquiry, contemporary maps or from historical documentation.  


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Helvellyn

Name:  Pt. 424m

Previously Listed Name:  Watermillock Fell 

Summit Height:  424m

OS 1:50,000 map:  90

Summit Grid Reference:  NY 42459 23318  

Drop:  39m


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (May 2018)






Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

The Warren (SO 318 685) - 10th significant name change

Survey post for The Warren


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the summit height, drop and status of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 15th February 2018.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

Accompanying the main list of The Fours are three categories of sub hills, with this hill being classified in the 400m Sub-Four category.  The criteria for 400m Sub-Four status are all English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 20m or more and below 30m of drop.

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38B with its Cardinal Hill being Beacon Hill (SO 176 767).  The hill is positioned above the B 4355 road which is to its south-west, and is situated between the small community of Norton to the south-west and the town of Trefyclo (Knighton) to the north-west.

The Warren (SO 318 685)

This hill was not included in the listing that is now known as The Fours when originally compiled as it did not at that stage meet the criteria for the sub-list which was entitled ‘Hills to measure’, this sub-list has now been standardised and therefore this hill is included.  When this list was subsequently uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database and data then augmented from Clem Clements it appeared listed as; Stonewall Hill (The Warren)

Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of this hill there are two names that are consistently applied near to its summit on different scaled Ordnance Survey maps, these names are Stonewall Hill and The Warren.

With time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research the most appropriate name for the hill can usually be found, and in the case of this hill it is the series of different scaled Ordnance Survey maps whose placement of the names Stonewall Hill and The Warren have been generally consistent that imply the most appropriate name for this hill is The Warren, however for clarification of the land boundary given to these two names it is the Tithe map that was consulted.


Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

Since the original publication of this list on the RHB Yahoo Group file database there have been a number of Ordnance Survey maps made available online, some of these are historical such as the series of Six-Inch maps on the National Library of Scotland website, whilst others are current and digitally updated such as the Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website.  One of the historical maps now available is the One-Inch ‘Old Series’ map which was the first map made publicly available by the Ordnance Survey.

The One-Inch ‘Old Series’ was the first map that Ordnance Survey published, and they were based on the preceding Draft Surveyors map.  There publication culminated from the whole of Britain being surveyed between 1791 and 1874 and the detail gathered therein produced at a scale of one inch to the mile and published in sheet format between 1805 and 1874.  The One-Inch ‘Old Series’ maps for the whole of England are now available online; they are also available in map format as enlarged and re-projected versions to match the scale and dimensions on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger series and are published by Cassini.  This series of maps forms another important part in the study of upland place-names and bridge the time frame leading to the production of the Ordnance Survey base map of the Six-Inch series.


Extract from the Ordnance Survey One-Inch 'Old Series' map

The term Tithe map is generally given to a map of a Welsh or English parish or township and which was prepared after the 1836 Tithe Commutation Act.  This act allowed tithes to be paid in cash rather than goods.  The Tithe maps gave names of owners and occupiers of land in each parish and importantly for place-name research they also included the name of enclosed land.  This enclosed land is usually based on a field system, however not every field is given a name, but many are and especially so in these two countries.


The enclosed land where the summit of a hill is situated is usually given a number on the Tithe map, this can be cross referenced against the apportionments; it is these apportionments that give the name of the owner or occupier of the land as well as the name of the land.  However, in this instance the land where the summit of this hill is situated is named as The Warren, with the land boundary between it and Stonewall Hill being the narrow road to the west of the summit which also forms a part of the designated border between England and Wales.  This information appears on the Tithe map for the counties of Hereford and Radnor and in the parish of Presteigne.

Extract from the Tithe map

Therefore, the name this hill is listed by in The Fours is The Warren and this was derived from the series of different scaled Ordnance Survey maps and substantiated by the Tithe map. 


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Beacon Hill

Name:  The Warren

Previously Listed Name:  Stonewall Hill (The Warren)
  
Summit Height:  403.8m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137, 148

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 31855 68590
  
Drop:  27.45m (converted to OSGM15)



Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (March 2018)






Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Bury Ditches (SO 327 838) - 9th significant name change

Survey post for the Bury Ditches


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the summit height and drop of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 8th March 2017.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

Accompanying the main list of The Fours are three categories of sub hills, with this hill being classified in the 390m Sub-Four category.  The criteria for 390m Sub-Four status are all English hills at and above 390m and below 400m in height that have a minimum 30m of drop.

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being Cilfaesty (SO 128 840).  The hill is positioned above the A 488 road which is to its west, and has a number of B roads then encircling it with the B 4385 to its north, the B 4368 to its south and the continuation of the B 4385 to its east, and is situated between the small towns of Bishop’s Castle towards its north and Clun to its south-west.

Bury Ditches (SO 327 838)

This hill was not included in the listing that is now known as The Fours when originally compiled as it did not at that stage include a sub-list to the hills at and above 390m and below 400m in height.  When this list was subsequently uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database and data then augmented from Clem Clements it appeared listed as; Sunnyhill (Bury Ditches) Subsequently the hill was listed as Sunnyhill in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013. 

Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of this hill there are two names that are consistently applied near to its summit on different scaled Ordnance Survey maps, these names are Bury Ditches and Sunnyhill. 

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

Extract from the series of Ordnance Survey Six-Inch maps

Information board at the start of the main path to Bury Ditches

With time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research the prioritised locally known name for the hill can usually be found, and in this case it was an on-site visit and research conducted locally by Myrddyn Phillips that deduced the locally known contemporary name for this hill is Bury Ditches, with the caveat that historical documentation gives the older name for the hill as Tongley Hill.

Extract from:  A system of Geography: Ancient and Modern, Volume 2 by James Playfair

Extract from:  Companion to the Wye tour, Ariconensia; or, Archæological Scetches of Ross... by Thomas Dudley Fosbroke

Therefore, the name this hill will be listed by in the 2nd edition of The Fours due for publication in early 2018 by Mapping Mountains Publications is Bury Ditches and this was derived from an on-site visit, historical and contemporary Ordnance Survey maps and local enquiry.  


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Beacon Hill

Name:  Bury Ditches

Previously Listed Name:  Sunnyhill 

Summit Height:  394.1m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 32753 83805

Drop:  146.7m (converted to OSGM15)


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Bury Ditches (SO 327 838)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (February 2018)






Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Brow Hill (SO 363 956) - 8th significant name change

Survey post for Brow Hill


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the summit height, drop and status of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 22nd March 2015.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop.

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being the Stiperstones (SO 367 986).  The hill is positioned above the River West Onny to its west and the River East Onny to its east and is encircled by a number of minor lanes, and has the small community of the Bridges towards the east north-east and Wentnor towards the south-east.

Brow Hill (SO 363 956)

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Linley Hill, this was also the name it appeared as when the list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as Brow Hill in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013. 


Linley Hill      409m        SO 364 956
    (29m)



Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found, and in this case it was research conducted by Aled Williams with the local farming community where the name for the hill was given as Brow Hill.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Brow Hill and this was derived from local enquiry. 


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Stiperstones

Name:  Brow Hill

Previously Listed Name:  Linley Hill 

Summit Height:  408.9m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 36328 95615
  
Drop:  33.9m (converted to OSGM15)


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Brow Hill (SO 363 956)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (February 2018)






Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Linley Hill (SO 358 943) - 7th significant name change

Survey post for Linley Hill


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the summit height and drop of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 22nd March 2015.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop.

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being the Stiperstones (SO 367 986).  The hill is positioned above the River West Onny to its west and the River East Onny to its east and is encircled by a number of minor lanes, and has the small community of the Bridges towards the north-east and Wentnor towards the south-east.

Linley Hill (SO 358 943)

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Norbury Hill, this was also the name it appeared as when the list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as Linley Hill in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013. 


Norbury Hill        411m        SO 358 944




Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of this hill there are two names that are consistently applied near to its summit on different scaled Ordnance Survey maps, these names are Norbury Hill and Linley Hill. 

Extract from the series of Ordnance Survey Six-Inch maps

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Historical map

With time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research the prioritised locally known name for the hill can usually be found, and in this case it was research conducted by Aled Williams with the local farming community where the name for the hill was consistently given as Linley Hill.

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Linley Hill and this was derived from historical and contemporary Ordnance Survey maps and substantiated by local enquiry.  


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Stiperstones

Name:  Linley Hill

Previously Listed Name:  Norbury Hill 

Summit Height:  411.2m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 35873 94366 

Drop:  70.5m (converted to OSGM15)


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Linley Hill (SO 358 943)



Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (February 2018)






Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Stoney Pound Hill (SO 234 808) - 6th significant name change

Survey post for Stoney Pound Hill


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the summit height of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 10th March 2015.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being Cilfaesty (SO 128 840).  The hill is positioned above a number of minor roads and has the River Clun to its north and the River Teme to its south, and has the small community of Newcastle to its north-east and the town of Clun to its east.

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Hurgin North Top, the name was then given as Garn Rock Hill~ (Hurgin: N Top) when this list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database and data then augmented from Clem Clements.

Hurgin North Top    437m      SO 234 808


Authors name from hill to the South


During my early hill listing I thought it appropriate to either invent a name for a hill, or use a name that appeared near to the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  This included using a directional name, which supplants the name of another hill as that for the hill in question and adding a directional element to it, as in; Hurgin North Top.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found, and in this case the name Stoney Pound Hill was derived through research conducted by Aled Williams with the local farming community.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Stoney Pound Hill and this was derived from local enquiry. 


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Beacon Hill

Name:  Stoney Pound Hill

Previously Listed Name:  Hurgin North Top 

Summit Height:  438.3m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 23445 80810
  
Drop:  61m


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Stoney Pound Hill (SO 234 808)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (February 2018)






Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Pt. 425.4m (SO 243 801) - 5th significant name change

Survey post for Pt. 425.4m


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the height, drop and status of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 10th March 2015.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

Accompanying the main list of The Fours are three categories of sub hills, with this hill being classified in the 400m Sub-Four category.  The criteria for 400m Sub-Four status are all English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 20m or more and below 30m of drop.

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being Cilfaesty (SO 128 840).  The hill is positioned above a number of minor roads and has Offa’s Dyke and its long distance footpath to its east, and has the small community of Newcastle to its north and the village of Llanfair Waterdine to its south.

Pt. 425.4m (SO 243 801)

This hill was not included in the listing that is now known as The Fours when originally compiled as it did not at that stage meet the criteria for the accompanying sub list which was entitled; Hills to Measure.  When this list was subsequently uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database and data then augmented from Clem Clements it appeared listed as; Spoad Hill

Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of Spoad Hill this name appears on a number of different scaled Ordnance Survey maps and has been consistently applied to the west – east orientated road at a crossroads to the north-east of this hill’s summit close to where Springfield Farm is positioned and not necessarily to the hill itself.  This form of supplanting a name is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Historical map

Extract from the series of Ordnance Survey Six-Inch maps

However, on occasion even after local or historical research an appropriate name for a hill cannot be substantiated and in the case of this hill it was Aled Williams who undertook research with a number of local farmers, all of whom failed to give a name for this hill and importantly were of the opinion that it was not named Spoad Hill, during this research information was given that the adjacent open access land to this hill’s summit is known locally as The Turbary.

Information board showing the boundary of The Turbary

Therefore, as the authors do not know a name for this hill that has local or historical evidence of use, the point (Pt. 425.4m) notation is being used in preference to using a supplanted name where the authors have not found evidence that it applies to the hill itself.

Prior to the 1st edition of The Fours being published by Europeaklist in December 2013 this hill was not included in this list, therefore although there is no change in this hill’s listed name within The Fours it is worth categorising under the heading of Significant Name Changes as the name this hill is now listed by uses the point (Pt. 425.4m) notation and diverges from that used in the RHB Yahoo group file database.
  
Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Pt. 425.4m and this follows the standard practice of using the point notation for hill’s whose name has not been substantiated either through local enquiry or from historical documentation.  


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Beacon Hill

Name:  Pt. 425.4m

Previously Listed Name:  Not previously listed in The Fours 

Summit Height:  425.4m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 24364 80193

Drop:  28.2m (converted to OSGM15)


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Pt. 425.4m (SO 243 801)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (February 2018)







Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Walker’s Bank (SO 389 984) - 4th significant name change

Survey post for Walker's Bank


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the height, drop and status of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 5th November 2014.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

Accompanying the main list of The Fours are three categories of sub hills, with this hill being classified in the 390m Sub-Four category.  The criteria for 390m Sub-Four status are all English hills at and above 390m and below 400m in height that have a minimum 30m of drop.

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being the Stiperstones (SO 367 986).  The hill is positioned above a number of minor lanes with the one to its south-west being a part of the Shropshire Way, and has the small communities of Stiperstones towards its north-west and Picklescott towards its east north-east.

Walker's Bank (SO 389 984)

This hill was not included in the listing that is now known as The Fours when originally compiled as it did not at that stage include a sub-list to the hills at and above 390m and below 400m in height.  When this list was subsequently uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database and data then augmented from Clem Clements it appeared listed as; unnamed summit~.  These data were then duplicated by Mark Jackson to form this height band within the Tumps and this hill is now listed as Gatten Hill within that list, presumably so as there are a number of buildings positioned near to this hill with the name Gatten applied to them on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, such as Gatten Lodge, Far Gatten and Near Gatten Farm.

Although I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, the practice of inventing a hill name based on the proximity of buildings near to where it is situated is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found, and this hill now appears under the name of Walker’s Bank in The Fours due to research conducted by Aled William’s with local farmers.

Prior to the 1st edition of The Fours being published by Europeaklist in December 2013 this hill was not included in this list, therefore although there is no change in this hill’s listed name within The Fours it is worth categorising under the heading of Significant Name Changes as the name this hill is now listed by comes from local enquiry. 
  
Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Walker’s Bank and this was derived from local enquiry. 


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Stiperstones

Name:  Walker’s Bank

Previously Listed Name:  Not previously listed in The Fours

Summit Height:  399.0m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 38905 98491
  
Drop:  43.6m (converted to OSGM15)


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Walker's Bank (SO 389 984)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (February 2018)







Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

The Cold Piece (SO 338 996) - 3rd significant name change

Survey post for The Cold Piece

Hill Reclassification post for The Cold Piece


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the height, drop and status of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 5th November 2014.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

Accompanying the main list of The Fours are three categories of sub hills, with this hill being reclassified to the 390m Sub-Four category.  The criteria for 390m Sub-Four status are all English hills at or above 390m and below 400m in height that have a minimum 30m of drop.
The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being the Stiperstones (SO 367 986).  The hill is positioned above the A 488 road and the upper reaches of the Hope Valley which are to its north-west, and has the small community of Snailbeach towards the north-east.

The Cold Piece (SO 338 996)

Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of Shelve Hill this name has been consistently applied by the Ordnance Survey to land south-west of this hill’s summit and approximately 1km from it.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found, and in the case of this hill it was research conducted by Aled Williams with a local farmer who gave the name of The Cold Piece for this hill.

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Shelve Hill, this was also the name it appeared as when the list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as The Cold Piece in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013. 


Shelve Hill        400c        SO 338 997



Named from village to the South


Hill list authors are prone to list a hill by the name that appears nearest to its summit on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, without much consideration for its local or historical confirmation, or whether map placement is appropriate, and in the case of Shelve Hill this name has been consistently applied by the Ordnance Survey to land south-west of this hill’s summit and approximately 1km from it.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with time and inclination place-name data can be improved either by asking local people or by examining historical documents, through this form of research an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found, and in this case it was research conducted by Aled Williams with a local farmer who gave the name of The Cold Piece for this hill.

  
Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Historical map

Extract from the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is The Cold Piece and this was derived from local enquiry. 


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Stiperstones

Name:  The Cold Piece

Previously Listed Name:  Shelve Hill

Summit Height:  399.5m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 33849 99695

Drop:  57.5m (converted to OSGM15)

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of The Cold Piece (SO 338 996)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (January 2018)







Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Burway Hill (SO 440 942) - 2nd significant name change

Survey post for Burway Hill


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the height, drop and status of the hill confirmed by a Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey conducted by Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 19th February 2014.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop.  The criteria for 400m Sub-Four status are all English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 20m and more and below 30m of drop.
  
The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Welsh Borders and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A with its Cardinal Hill being the Stiperstones (SO 367 986).  The hill is a part of the Long Mynd and is positioned above the Carding Mill Valley to its north and the Townbrook Valley to its south, and has the town of Church Stretton to its east.

Burway Hill (SO 440 942)

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Devil’s Mouth, this was also the name it appeared as when the list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as Burway Hill in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013.

Devil's Mouth        400c        SO 441 942        Two points of same height







During my early hill listing I paid little regard to name placement on a map, or the meaning of names and to what feature the name was appropriately applied to, and used many names that seemingly applied to a hill and whose placement was nearest the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  Therefore I prioritised names for listing purposes that I now understand are inappropriate or where another name is viewed as being more appropriate, and Devil’s Mouth is such an example as this name has been consistently applied by the Ordnance Survey on maps that are viewed as being good for name placement such as the Six-Inch series and the 1:25,000 Historical map, to land immediately above the Devilsmouth Hollow which is a steep stream valley to the north-east of this hill, with the Devil’s Mouth the narrow neck of land where an ancient cross-dyke is situated with Burway Hill to the east of this point and the main Long Mynd plateau to the west.   

Extract from the Ordnance Survey series of Six-Inch maps

Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Burway Hill and this was derived from historical Ordnance Survey maps. 


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Stiperstones

Name:  Burway Hill

Previously Listed Name:  Devil’s Mouth 

Summit Height:  402.8m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 44061 94220 

Drop:  29.7m (converted to OSGM15)


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Burway Hill (SO 440 942)


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (January 2018)







Mapping Mountains - Significant Name Changes - The Fours

Cowpe Moss (SD 834 193) - 1st significant name change


There has been a Significant Name Change to a hill that is listed in The Fours, with the summit height of the hill having been determined by a Leica 530 survey conducted by John Barnard, Graham Jackson and Myrddyn Phillips which took place on the 8th July 2009.

The criteria for the list that this name change applies to are:

The Fours – English hills at and above 400m and below 500m in height that have 30m minimum drop. 

The list is co-authored by Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams, with the 1st edition of the list having been published by Europeaklist in December 2013 and by Haroldstreet in January 2014, with the 2nd edition of the list due for publication by Mapping Mountains Publications in early 2018.

The hill is situated in the Southern Pennines and is placed in Region 36, and is a Cardinal Hill.  The hill is positioned above a number of A roads with the A 681 to its north, the A 680 to its south-west and the A 671 to its east, and has the towns of Rawtenstall and Bacup to the north-west and north-east respectively and Rochdale to the south-east.

Cowpe Moss (SD 834 193)

When the listing that is now known as The Fours was originally compiled this hill appeared under the name of Cowpe Moss, the name was then given as Hailstorm Hill (Cowpe Moss) when this list was uploaded to the RHB Yahoo group file database.  Subsequently the hill was listed as Hailstorm Hill in the 1st edition of The Fours when the list was published by Europeaklist in December 2013.  The hill is now reverting to its original listed name for the 2nd edition of The Fours published by Mapping Mountains Publications.


477m        Hail Storm Hill (143)       109        SD 834 193        244m






Therefore, the name this hill is now listed by in The Fours is Cowpe Moss and this was derived from contemporary Ordnance Survey maps. 

Gathering data at the summit of Cowpe Moss


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Southern Pennines

Name:  Cowpe Moss

Previously Listed Name:  Hailstorm Hill 

Summit Height:  476.7m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  109

Summit Grid Reference:  SD 83497 19346  

Drop:  244m


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (January 2018)



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