Saturday, 25 November 2017

Mapping Mountains – Hill Reclassifications – Humps


Humps – Hill Reclassifications

The Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) are all hills in Britain that have a minimum drop of 100m, irrespective of their height, accompanying the main list is a sub-list entitled Subhumps with the criteria being all hills in Britain that have 90m and more and below 100m of drop.  The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.

The posts that have appeared on Mapping Mountains detailing the hill reclassifications specifically for this list appear below presented chronologically in receding order.









Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Pentir-bach (SN 739 300) – Subhump reclassified to Hump (35th reclassification)


This is the thirty fifth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has either been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated, or it is the recommendation that their status is altered.

Many preceding posts detailing these hill reclassifications to the Humps are retrospective as they were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website, or from surveying with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, or from LIDAR analysis, and for this reclassification that affected the Humps the email I posted on the Tump Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 24.11.18.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by LIDAR analysis conducted by Myrddyn Phillips.

This hill was initially listed as a Subhump with c 99m of drop based on the 198m spot height adjoined to a triangulation pillar positioned at SN 73901 30019 and an estimated bwlch height of c 99m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals and between 90m – 100m.

However, the advent of LIDAR has meant greater accuracy for summit and bwlch heights and their positions, with LIDAR analysis giving this hill a 198.5m summit height positioned at SN 73918 30015 and a 97.9m bwlch height positioned at SN 74245 30684, with these values giving this hill 100.6m of drop, which is sufficient for it to be reclassified to Hump status.

LIDAR image of Pentir-bach

Pentir-bach is adjoined to the Mynydd Du group of hills and is situated overlooking the Afon Tywi (River Towy) and the A4069 road to its north-west, and is positioned between the village of Llangadog towards its south-west the small town of and Llanymddyfri (Llandovery) towards its north-east.

The reclassification of this hill from Subhump to Hump status was accepted and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 25.11.18.


The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Pentir-bach (as listed in the Humps)

OS 1:50,000 map:  146, 160

OS 1:25,000 map:  12

Summit Height:  198.5m (LIDAR)

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 73921 30020 (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)

Bwlch Height:  98.0m (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SN 7423 3068 (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  100.5m (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)


Myrddyn Phillips (February 2019)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Mynydd Gelliwastad (SN 678 016) – Hump reclassified to Subhump (34th reclassification)


This is the thirty fourth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has either been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated, or it is the recommendation that their status is altered.

Many preceding posts detailing these hill reclassifications to the Humps are retrospective as they were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website, or from surveying with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, or from LIDAR analysis, and for this reclassification that affected the Humps the email I posted on the Tump Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 31.10.18.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the hill reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by LIDAR analysis conducted by Myrddyn Phillips.

This hill has a convoluted history of classification within the Humps with it initially listed as a Subhump with c 96m of drop based on the 213m spot height adjoined to a triangulation pillar positioned at SN 67799 01456 and an estimated bwlch height of c 117m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  This hill was then reclassified to a Hump (see Humps Reclassification post) based on the 213m trig pillar height and interpolation of 5m bwlch contours on the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website which refined the estimated height of the bwlch to c 113m, with these values giving this hill c 100m of drop and its reclassification to Hump status was accepted on the 19.07.12. 

However, the advent of LIDAR has meant greater accuracy for summit and bwlch heights and their positions, with LIDAR analysis giving this hill a 213.9m summit height positioned at SN 67852 01598 and a 114.8m bwlch height positioned at SN 67677 02435, with these values giving this hill 99.1m of drop, which is insufficient for it to retain its Hump status.

LIDAR summit image of Mynydd Gelliwastad

LIDAR bwlch image of Mynydd Gelliwastad

The reclassification of this hill from Hump to Subhump status was accepted and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 31.10.18.


The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Mynydd Gelliwastad

OS 1:50,000 map:  159

OS 1:25,000 map:  165

Summit Height:  214.0m (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 67855 01603 (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)

Bwlch Height:  114.8m (LIDAR)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SN 6767 0243 (LIDAR) (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  99.1m (LIDAR)


Myrddyn Phillips (February 2019)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Iolyn Park relocated to SH 781 758 – Subhump relocation (33rd reclassification)

Survey post for this hill


This is the thirty third in a series of Hill Reclassification and Summit Relocation posts that detail hills whose status or location has either been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated, or it is the recommendation that their status is altered.

The summit of the Subhump named Iolyn Park is now relocated to the grazing field on the right in the background of this photo

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

Many preceding posts detailing these alterations to the Humps are retrospective as these hill reclassifications and summit relocations were either initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map that is hosted on the Geograph website, or initiated from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for this summit relocation that affects the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 10.10.18, with the recommendation of this summit relocation posted on the Tump Yahoo Group forum on the 13.10.18.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the summit relocation appear below:

There has been a summit relocation to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 conducted by Myrddyn Phillips and which took place on the 10.10.18.

This summit relocation applies to two summits that also have a third adjoining summit all of similar map height that are orientated north to south with a northern, central and southern summit.  These three summits and their map details appear below:


Northern summit:  130m spot summit positioned at SH 78114 75813

Central summit:  130m ring contour positioned at SH 77799 75564

Southern summit:  130m ring contour positioned at SH 77584 75224


Mark Jackson gave the following details to these summits when he first collated the list of Tumps:


Northern summit:  Iolyn Park NE Top with 130m summit at SH 781 758 with c 34m of drop

Central summit:  not listed

Southern summit:  Iolyn Park with c 131m summit at SH 776 752 with c 97m of drop


The two hills listed in the original Tumps match those that Myrddyn Phillips listed in the original list of Welsh P30 hills that superseded the Tumps by a number of years.  The details in the Tumps were amended on the 25.11.12 and 19.11.13 resulting in the following:


Northern summit:  not listed

Central summit:  Iolyn Park with 130m summit at SH 777 755 with 96m of drop

Southern summit:  Gorse Hill with 130m summit at SH 775 752 with 33m of drop


Therefore at the time of the Trimble GeoXH 6000 survey on the 10.10.18 the Subhump was listed as Iolyn Park with a 130m summit positioned at SH 777 755 with 96m of drop.

These three summits were surveyed using the Trimble GeoXH 6000 resulting in the following:


Northern summit:  129.073m summit at SH 78116 75814

Central summit:  128.446m summit at SH 77790 75561

Southerly summit:  128.459m summit at SH 77584 75224


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 set-up position at the northerly summit which is now the relocated summit of the Subhump

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 set-up position at the central summit which was the old summit of the Subhump

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 set-up position at the southerly summit which was originally listed in the Tumps with c 97m of drop

The Subhump is listed under the name of Iolyn Park; this name appears on contemporary Ordnance Survey maps adjacent to land where the southern summit is situated.  However, research via the Tithe map and local enquiries with the owner of the Gorse Hill Caravan Park has resulted in the following names:


Northern summit:  Cae Alen (Tithe map)

Central summit:  Bwlch Mawr (Tithe map and local enquiry)

Southern summit:  Bryn Eithin (English map name and local enquiry)


These three summits are adjoined to the Carneddau range of hills and they are situated overlooking the Afon Conwy to the east and the B5106 road to the west, and have the town of Conwy towards the north.

The summit relocation of the Subhump was accepted and its new summit position augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 31.10.18.


The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Iolyn Park (as listed in the Humps)

OS 1:50,000 map:  115

OS 1:25,000 map:  17

Summit Height:  129.0m (as listed in the Humps, with the Trimble survey giving 129.1m)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 781 758 (as listed in the Humps, with the Trimble giving SH 78116 75814)

Bwlch Height:  34m (as listed in the Humps, with LIDAR giving 34.8m)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 776 740 (as listed in the Humps, with LIDAR giving SH 77629 74003)

Drop:  95m (as listed in the Humps, with Trimble summit and LIDAR bwlch giving 94.3m drop)


Myrddyn Phillips (February 2019)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Old Radnor Hill (SO 251 587) – Recommended Subhump deletion (32nd reclassification if implemented)

Survey post for Old Radnor Hill

Significant Height Revisions post for Old Radnor Hill


This is the thirty second in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has either been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated, or it is the recommendation that their status is altered.

The remains of Old Radnor Hill (SO 251 587)

Many preceding posts detailing these alterations to the Humps are retrospective as these hill reclassifications were either initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map that is hosted on the Geograph website, or initiated from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for this recommended deletion that affects the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 11.01.14 with LIDAR analysis conducted on the 20 & 21.09.18.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the recommended deletion appear below:

There has been a recommended deletion to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 11.01.14 and subsequent LIDAR analysis conducted by Myrddyn Phillips.

This hill has a convoluted history of classification within the Humps and prior to LIDAR analysis the hill had previously been listed as a Hump with a 327m summit height and 110m of drop, due to the hill being quarried its drop value was reduced in April 2011 to c 100m based on a reduction in its estimated summit height to c 317m, with it still retaining its Hump status.  The hill was then reclassified to a Subhump in January 2013 based on a 222m bwlch height which gave the hill c 95m of drop.  As well as the summit being reduced in height due to quarrying, there is a road cutting to the east of the hill which if taken as a part of the hill’s drop would increase this value.  The hill was subsequently surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 resulting in a 312.6m (converted to OSGM15) summit height and a 222.7m (converted to OSGM15) height to what was judged to be the highest remaining natural ground of the critical bwlch, and a 215.6m (converted to OSGM15) height to the road cutting, resulting in an 89.9m and 97.1m drop respectively.  With the hill being temporarily deleted from Subhump status on the 13.09.14 based on the drop value being taken to what was judged to be the highest remaining natural ground of the critical bwlch.  The re-instatement of this hill to Subhump status was based on the survey taken to the road cutting and was accepted by Mark Jackson and it was added to the listing of the Humps on 22.12.15.

The hill is adjoined to the Fforest Glud range of hills and is situated overlooking the A 44 road to its east, and has the small community of Walton towards the north-north-east and Old Radnor towards the north-west.

The recommendation of this hill’s deletion from Subhump status is based on LIDAR analysis coupled with the summit survey using the Trimble GeoXH 6000.  LIDAR gives the summit of this hill as 319.4m at SO 25177 58811, whilst the survey with the Trimble produced a summit height of 312.6m (converted to OSGM15) at SO 25135 58770, the discrepancy in height is due to quarrying activity between the date that LIDAR was produced and the survey using the Trimble.

The listed drop valley of this hill will be based on the height and position of its bwlch.  An on-site inspection of this bwlch during the survey with the Trimble concluded that the natural bwlch had been terra-formed and lay in a Chapel, this is placed beside a minor road, which is placed above the A44 road which forms a cutting, all three are placed on the hill to hill traverse associated with this hill.  Therefore there are three options for the height and position of this bwlch.  Their respective Trimble and LIDAR data are given below:


Option 1 – natural bwlch:

Trimble:  222.7m at SO 25888 59083

LIDAR:  222.8m at SO 25887 59097



Option 2 – minor road beside Chapel:

Trimble:  not surveyed

LIDAR:  222.6m at SO 25899 59099



Option 3 – A44 road cutting:

Trimble:  215.6m at SO 25946 59114

LIDAR:  215.4m at SO 25943 59107


LIDAR contouring suggests that the natural bwlch of this hill is intact and placed beside the Chapel and an on-site inspection confirms this consists of grass.  Therefore as the A44 road cutting is man-made and the natural bwlch still exists the third option for the bwlch is dismissed.  However, the height of the minor road (option 2) beside the Chapel is lower on the hill to hill traverse compared to option 1, but LIDAR implies and the on-site inspection concluded that this minor road also forms a slight road cutting and therefore it is also considered man-made.

LIDAR image of the bwlch of Old Radnor Hill

Therefore, as LIDAR contouring implies that the natural bwlch of this hill is intact it is recommended that this hill is deleted from the status of Subhump based on Trimble GeoXH 6000 summit and LIDAR bwlch data.


The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Old Radnor Hill

OS 1:50,000 map:  148

OS 1:25,000 map:  201

Summit Height:  312.6m (converted to OSGM15, Trimble GeoXH 6000)

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 25122 58775 (as listed in the Humps, with the Trimble survey taken to SO 25135 58770)

Bwlch Height:  222.8m (LIDAR)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SO 25887 59097

Drop:  89.9m (Trimble summit and LIDAR bwlch)


Myrddyn Phillips (November 2018)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Twyn y Waun (SO 082 070) – Recommended Subhump addition (31st reclassification if implemented)

Survey post for Twyn y Waun


This is the thirty first in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has either been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated, or it is the recommendation that their status is altered.

The artificial summit of Twyn y Waun (SO 082 070)

Many preceding posts detailing these alterations to the Humps are retrospective as these hill reclassifications were either initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey Interactive Coverage Map that is hosted on the Geograph website, or initiated from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the recommended addition that affects the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 01.12.17.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the recommended reclassification appear below:

There has been a recommended reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 01.12.17.

This hill has an intact natural summit and an artificial summit that now overshadows it and Mark Jackson lists this hill with 63m of drop based on an estimated c 451m height for the natural summit which has an uppermost 450m contour on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map and the Interactive Coverage Map hosted on the Geograph website, and an estimated bwlch height of 388m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals and between 380m – 390m on the 1:25,000 Explorer map.  However, OS Maps which is the recent replacement for OS Get-a-map gives bwlch contouring at 5m intervals and between 375m – 380m, with the latter height taking in the width of a road and indicating an estimated bwlch height of c 380m, which if the artificial summit was taken for that of the hill gives this hill c 96m of drop. 

The natural summit of Twyn y Waun is now overshadowed by its artificial summit

Twyn y Waun is adjoined to the Y Cymoedd – dwyreiniol group of hills and is positioned between the town of Merthyr Tudful (Merthyr Tydfil) to its west and Rhymni (Rhymney) to its east and has the A 465 Heads of the Valleys Road to its north-west.

Therefore, if the artificial summit is taken as that for the hill it is recommended that its status is amended to that of Subhump.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Twn y Waun (as listed in the Tumps)

Summit Height:  451m (as listed in the Tumps) (476.0m [converted to OSGM15] artificial summit)

OS 1:50,000 map:  160

OS 1:25,000 map:  12, 166

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 08457 07348 (as listed in the Tumps) (artificial summit at SO 08209 07041)

Drop:  63m (as listed in the Tumps) (c 96m artificial summit)


Myrddyn Phillips (January 2018)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Pen y Graig-fawr (SN 773 996) – Recommended Subhump deletion (30th reclassification if implemented)

Survey post for Pen y Graig-fawr


This is the thirtieth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has either been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated, or it is the recommendation that their status is altered.

Pen y Graig-fawr (SN 773 996)

Many preceding posts detailing these alterations to the Humps are retrospective as these hill reclassifications were either initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or initiated from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the recommended reclassification that affects the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 29.10.17.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the recommended reclassification appear below:

There has been a recommended reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 29.10.17.

Mark Jackson lists this hill with 99m of drop based on the 217m summit spot height given to a triangulation pillar that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of 118m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals and between 120m – 130m. 

The height of the above estimated bwlch is at odds with Ordnance Survey contouring.

Interpolation of 10m bwlch contouring suggests a height of c 217m, giving this hill the minimum of c 90m of drop for continued Subhump status.  However, OS Maps which has recently replaced OS Get-a-map gives bwlch contouring at 5m intervals and between 125m – 130m, with interpolation suggesting a height of c 128m, which would give this hill c 89m of drop.

Pen y Graig-fawr also has an adjacent summit named Copa Shon (SN 781 993) of equal 217m map height, with this summit height appearing on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map and the enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website.

Copa Shon (SN 781 993)

These two equal map heighted summits are adjoined to the Pumlumon group of hills and are situated between the A 489 road to the north and the Afon Dulas to the south, and they are positioned with the town of Machynlleth to the west north-west and the small community of Penegoes towards the north.

These two hills were surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 29.10.17 resulting in a 216.833m (converted to OSGM15) summit height for Pen y Graig-fawr and a 217.336m (converted to OSGM15) summit height for Copa Shon, therefore as Copa Shon is higher than Pen y Graig-fawr their respective critical bylchau are swapped.  Each bwlch was surveyed using the Trimble GeoXH 6000 with the following results:


127.885m (converted to OSGM15) at SN 80033 98740

182.393m (converted to OSGM15) at SN 77600 99583

Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at the summit of Pen y Graig-fawr


Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at the summit of Copa Shon


Gathering data at the critical bwlch

The bwlch positioned at SN 800 987 is that for the higher of these two summits and therefore as Pen y Graig-fawr is lower than Copa Shon it is recommended that its Subhump status is swapped to the higher summit, but as Copa Shon only has 89.5m of drop it is recommended that the status of Subhump is deleted.


The full details for the hill listed as a Subhump are:

Name:  Pen y Graig-fawr

Summit Height:  216.8m (converted to OSGM15) (Copa Shon is higher)

OS 1:50,000 map:  135

OS 1:25,000 map:  23, 215

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 773 996 (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  99m (as listed in the Humps) (surveyed as having only 34.4m of drop with Copa Shon having 89.5m of drop)


Myrddyn Phillips (January 2018)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Mynydd y Drum (SN 820 108) – Subhump addition (29th reclassification)

Survey post for Mynydd y Drum


This is the twenty ninth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys and / or on-site visits that I have conducted.

The hill listed as Mynydd y Drum (SN 820 108) in the Humps

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from analysis of LIDAR data by Kevin McGovern and also independently by Aled Williams and then George Gradwell, resulting in an on-site visit when the hill was surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the on-site visit and survey of this hill took place on the 13.06.17.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by analysis of LIDAR data by Kevin McGovern, Aled Williams and George Gradwell, resulting in an on-site visit when the hill was surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, with the latter taking place on the 13.06.17.

Prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 Mark Jackson had not listed this hill as it consists of waste spoil from the Nant Helen Opencast Mine that is now landscaped and it was only the analysis of LIDAR data that resulted in this hill being brought to the attention as a prospective Subhump addition.  For a detailed explanation of this hill, its height and those of adjacent hills please see Significant Height Revisions.

The hill appears under the name of Mynydd y Drum in the listing of the Humps, this is the name of the broad ridge that this and two other listed hills appear on.  When the on-site visit and survey took place I made place-name enquiries with two of the remaining six miners who still operate the opencast mine and they know the hill as Teisen Priodas, for a detailed explanation please refer to Significant Name Changes.

The hill is adjoined to the Fforest Fawr group and is situated overlooking the A 4067, A 4221 and A 4109 roads to the north-west, north-east and south-east respectively, and is positioned between the small communities of Abercraf (Abercrave) to the north and Coelbren towards the east.

This hill was surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 13.06.17 resulting in a 337.9m (converted to OSGM15) summit height and a 244.6m (converted to OSGM15) bwlch height, with these values giving this hill 93.3m drop, with photographs and a description of the on-site visit and survey being sent to George Gradwell who then initiated this hill’s addition as a Subhump.

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson on the 14.06.17 and the listing of the Humps was updated accordingly.

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of the hill listed as Mynydd y Drum in the Humps

The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Mynydd y Drum (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  338.2m (as listed in the Humps)

OS 1:50,000 map:  160

OS 1:25,000 map:  12

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 820 108 (as listed in the Humps, SN 82013 10833 Trimble GeoXH 6000 set-up position)

Drop:  93.4m (as listed in the Humps) 


Myrddyn Phillips (November 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Banc y Celyn (SO 047 464) – Subhump reclassified to Hump (28th reclassification)

Bwlch survey post for Banc y Celyn


This is the twenty eighth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and also in this instance the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map, with the subsequent survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 confirming these initial investigations, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the details relating to this hill were sent to Mark Jackson via email on the 14.12.11 with the survey of this hill that finally confirmed its reclassification to Hump status taking place on the 18.08.15.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website and the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map, with these details sent to Mark Jackson via email on 14.12.11, and the confirmation of this hill’s reclassification via a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 18.08.15.

Prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 97m of drop based on the 472m summit spot height given to a triangulation pillar on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 375m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.

The details relating to this hill’s drop and its status had previously been discussed by Mark Jackson and other DoBIH editors prior to him receiving the email on the 14.12.11, with much of the discussion centred on a series of levelled heights that appeared on the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch map, an extract from this series of maps appears below, and even though these levelled heights were not placed where interpolation would position the critical bwlch and the publicly available 1:25,000 Explorer map showed a 372m spot height where interpolation of bwlch contouring would place the critical bwlch, and therefore giving this hill 100m of drop, its reclassification was not accepted.  After much debate and analysis one of the DoBIH editors concluded that Banc y Celyn only had a 6% probability of qualifying as a Hump.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch map showing the series of levelled heights everywhere but the bwlch of this hill

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map showing the 372m spot height at this hill's bwlch

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 372m spot height at this hill's bwlch

The hill is adjoined to the Mynydd Epynt group of hills and is situated overlooking the A 470 road and the Afon Gwy (River Wye) to its east and the B 4520 road to its west, with the town of Llanfair-ym-Muallt (Builth Wells) positioned towards the north.

The bwlch of Banc y Celyn was surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 18.08.15 resulting in a 369.9m (converted to OSGM15) height, and when coupled with this hill’s 472m summit height this value gives the hill 102m of drop, which is sufficient for its reclassification to Hump status.

The reclassification of this hill from Subhump to Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson on the 20.12.15 and the listing of the Humps was updated accordingly.

Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at the critical bwlch of Banc y Celyn

The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Banc y Celyn

Summit Height:  472m

OS 1:50,000 map:  147

OS 1:25,000 map:  188

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 04769 46438

Drop:  102m


Myrddyn Phillips (November 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Bryn Mawr (SJ 251 190) – Subhump addition (27th reclassification)

Survey post for Bryn Mawr 


This is the twenty seventh in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

Bryn Mawr (SJ 251 190)

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 08.08.15.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 08.08.15.

Prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 Mark Jackson had listed this hill with 85m of drop based on a 173m summit height and an 88m bwlch height. 

The hill is adjoined to the Carnedd Wen group of hills and is situated overlooking the B 4393 road which is to its north and east and the A 483 road to its south-east, and has the Montgomery Canal to its east and the Afon Efyrnwy (River Vyrnwy) to its north, and is positioned between the small communities of Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain to the west north-west, Llanymynech to the north-east, Four Crosses to the east south-east and Ardllin (Arddleen) towards the south.

Bryn Mawr was surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 08.08.15 resulting in a 90m drop value, with a summit height of 178.1m (converted to OSGM15) and a bwlch height of 88m based on the spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website, with this drop value being sufficient for this hill to be classified as a Subhump.

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson on the 21.12.15 and the listing of the Humps was updated accordingly.

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Bryn Mawr

The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Bryn Mawr

Summit Height:  178m (178.1m converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  126

OS 1:25,000 map:  240

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 25119 19058 (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  90m


Myrddyn Phillips (November 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Moel Garegog (SJ 216 525) – Subhump addition (26th reclassification)

Survey post for Moel Garegog


This is the twenty sixth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

Moel Garegog (SJ 216 525)

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 22.08.14.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 22.08.14.

Prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 Mark Jackson had listed this hill with 89m of drop based on the 413m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer maps and a 324m spot height that appears on the A 525 road on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map. 

The hill is adjoined to the Moel y Gamelin group of hills and is situated overlooking the A 5104 to its north-west and the A 525 road to its south-east, with the small community of Pen-y-stryt to the west south-west and Bwlchgwyn towards the east north-east.

Moel Garegog was surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 22.08.14 resulting in 90.1m drop value, with a summit height of 413.1m (converted to OSGM15) and a bwlch height of 323.0m (converted to OSGM15), with this drop value being sufficient for this hill to be classified as a Subhump.

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson on the 22.09.14 and the listing of the Humps was updated accordingly.

Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at the summit of Moel Garegog (SJ 216 525)

The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Moel Garegog

Summit Height:  413.1m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  117

OS 1:25,000 map:  256

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 21647 52525 (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  90.1m (converted to OSGM15)


Myrddyn Phillips (November 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Foel Grafiau (SN 765 920) – Non-prioritised Twin Hump deletion (25th reclassification)

Survey post for Foel Grafiau


This is the twenty fifth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

The hill that was listed as Foel Grafiau in the Humps and still is in the Tumps (SN 765 920)

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 18.05.14.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 18.05.14.

Mark Jackson had originally listed this hill with c 30m of drop based on the 529m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 499m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  This hill was listed as a non-prioritised Twin Hump along with two other 529m summit spot heighted hills which are positioned at SN 764 943 (previously listed as non-prioritised Twin Hump) and SN 765 926 (previously listed as prioritised Twin Hump).  Therefore, prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 this hill was listed as a non-prioritised Twin Hump.

The hill appeared under the name of Foel Grafiau in the listing of the Humps, this is the name of a 493m map heighted hill that is listed as a 400m Sub-Pedwar and which is positioned at SN 959 920.  However, research via the Tithe map confirms the hill that appeared in the Humps by the name of Foel Grafiau and which is still listed in the Tumps as being the highest point on the former sheep-walk of Lluest y Rhos, with the hill listed in the Y Pedwarau as Mynydd Lluest y Rhos (see Significant Name Changes).

The hill is adjoined to the Pumlumon group of hills and is situated between the A 489 road to the north and the A 44 road to the south, and is positioned between the town of Machynlleth towards the north and the small community of Ffwrnais (Furnace) towards the west.

This hill and its adjacent twin map heighted summits were surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 18.05.14 resulting in a 528.3m (converted to OSGM15) summit height, which proved lower than the 529.4m (converted to OSGM15) summit at SN 764 943, with the other summit being 528.7m (converted to OSGM15) at SN 765 926, with this survey confirming this hill’s deletion from non-prioritised Twin Hump status with 30.0m of drop.

The deletion of this hill from non-prioritised Twin Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and it was removed from the listing of the Humps on 22.09.14.

Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at the summit positioned at SN 765 920

The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Foel Grafiau (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  528.2m (as listed in the Humps) (528.3m converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  135

OS 1:25,000 map:  23, 215

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 76546 92035 (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  30.0m


Myrddyn Phillips (November 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Foel Fras (SN 765 926) – Prioritised Twin Hump deletion (24th reclassification)

Survey post for Foel Fras


This is the twenty fourth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

Foel Fras (SN 765 926) on right of photo

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 18.05.14.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 18.05.14.

Mark Jackson had originally listed this hill with c 105m of drop based on the 529m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 424m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  This hill was listed as a prioritised Twin Hump along with two other non-prioritised Twin Hump 529m summit spot heighted hills which are positioned at SN 764 943 and SN 765 920.  Therefore, prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 this hill was listed as a prioritised Twin Hump.  
   
The hill is adjoined to the Pumlumon group of hills and is situated between the A 489 road to the north and the A 44 road to the south, and is positioned between the town of Machynlleth towards the north and the small community of Ffwrnais (Furnace) towards the west.

This hill and its adjacent twin map heighted summits were surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 18.05.14 resulting in a 528.7m (converted to OSGM15) summit height, which proved lower than the 529.4m (converted to OSGM15) summit at SN 764 943, with the other summit being 528.3m (converted to OSGM15) at SN 765 920, with this survey confirming this hill’s deletion from prioritised Twin Hump status with 67.6m of drop.

The deletion of this hill from prioritised Twin Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and it was removed from the listing of the Humps on 22.09.14.

Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at the summit of Foel Fras

The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Foel Fras

Summit Height:  528.7m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  135

OS 1:25,000 map:  23, 215

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 76548 92610 (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  67.6m (converted to OSGM15)


Myrddyn Phillips (October 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Pen y Darren (SN 764 943) – Non-prioritised Twin Hump reclassified to Hump (23rd reclassification)

Survey post for Pen y Darren


This is the twenty third in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

Pen y Darren (SN 764 943)

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 18.05.14.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 which took place on the 18.05.14.

Mark Jackson had originally listed this hill with c 65m of drop based on the 529m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 464m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  This hill was listed as a non-prioritised Twin Hump along with two other 529m summit spot heighted hills which are positioned at SN 765 926 (previously listed as prioritised Twin Hump) and SN 765 920 (previously listed as non-prioritised Twin Hump).  In November 2012 its drop value was amended to 68m due to the 461m bwlch spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website.  Therefore, prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 this hill was listed as a non-prioritised Twin Hump.  
    
When Mark Jackson originally listed this hill it appeared under the name of Moel Hyddgen which is the name that it appeared by in the Dewey listing, and which is an invented name partly based on the name of the stream valley to the south of the hill.  This hill and its two adjacent 529m map heighted summits were surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 and the details relating to this hill were submitted under the name of Pen y Darren which appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map close to this hill’s summit and which is also the name that some of the local sheep grazers know the hill by.

The hill is adjoined to the Pumlumon group of hills and is situated between the A 489 road to the north and the A 44 road to the south, and is positioned between the town of Machynlleth towards the north and the small community of Ffwrnais (Furnace) towards the west.

This hill and its adjacent twin map heighted summits were surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 18.05.14 resulting in a 529.4m (converted to OSGM15) summit height, which proved higher than the 528.7m (converted to OSGM15) summit at SN 765 926 and the 528.3m (converted to OSGM15) summit at SN 765 920, with this survey confirming this hill’s reclassification from non-prioritised Twin Hump to Hump status with 105m of drop.

The reclassification of this hill from non-prioritised Twin Hump to Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on 22.09.14.

Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at one of two mounds on the summit area of Pen y Darren

The full details for the hill are:

Name:  Pen y Darren

Summit Height:  529.4m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  135

OS 1:25,000 map:  23, 215

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 76435 94301 (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  105m


Myrddyn Phillips (October 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Llandegley Rocks (SO 131 618) – Subhump addition (22nd reclassification)

Survey post for Llandegley Rocks


This is the twenty second in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

Llandegley Rocks (SO 131 618 [as listed in the Humps])

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website and the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch base maps available online, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the details relating to this hill were sent to Mark Jackson via email on the 11.05.14.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey 1:2,500 base map available online, with these details being sent to Mark Jackson on 11.05.14.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 89m of drop based on the 436m summit height given to a triangulation pillar on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 347m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  However, the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map has a 345m bwlch spot height that derives from the 1131ft (344.7m) levelled height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:2,500 map, with these values giving the hill 91m of drop which is sufficient for it to be classified as a Subhump.  This hill has subsequently been analysed with LIDAR data by Aled Williams and surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, with the latter resulting in a 436.3m summit at SO 13202 61752 and a 345.5m bwlch at SO 11361 59616, with these values giving this hill 90.8m of drop.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:2,500 map showing the 1131ft imperial height on the area of this hill's bwlch

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map showing the 345m spot height which was derived from the old 1131ft imperial height

Gathering data at the critical bwlch of Llandegley Rocks

The hill is adjoined to the Elfael range of hills and is situated overlooking the A 44 road which is to its east and north, and the Afon Ieithon (River Ithon) which is to its west, with the small community of Llandegley towards the north of the hill.

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 11.05.14.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Llandegley Rocks

Summit Height:  436m (as listed in the Humps) 

OS 1:50,000 map:  148

OS 1:25,000 map:  200

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 13148 61808 (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  91m (as listed in the Humps)


Myrddyn Phillips (October 2017)







Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Rhos Fawr (SN 999 883) – Subhump reclassified to Hump (21st reclassification)

1st survey post for Rhos Fawr

2nd survey post for Rhos Fawr


This is the twenty first in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

The hill listed as Rhos Fawr in the Humps (SN 999 883)

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the first survey of this hill took place on the 07.02.14.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 and which was later confirmed by a survey with the Leica GS15.

Prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Subhump with 91m of drop based on the 308m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and the 217m bwlch spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website.  This hill was listed as a twin as a 308m spot height also appears on Ordnance Survey maps for the hill whose summit is positioned at SO 01352 87384.

The hill appears under the name of Rhos Fawr in the listing of the Humps, this is the name of a farm to the west of the summit and not the name of the hill.  However, local enquiry and research via Ordnance Survey maps and the Tithe map finds that the name of Gelli Hir is more appropriate for this hill (see Significant Name Changes).

The hill is adjoined to the Pumlumon group of hills and is situated with the A 470 road and the Afon Hafren (River Severn) to its east, and is positioned between the small community of Caersws to the north-east and the town of Llanidloes towards the south-west.

This hill and its adjacent twin map heighted summit were surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 07.02.14 resulting in a 124m drop value for this hill, with its adjacent twin map heighted summit being 0.055m lower than Rhos Fawr, the hill was then re-surveyed on the 02.05.14 by John Barnard, Graham Jackson and Myrddyn Phillips using a Leica GS15 and Trimble GeoXH 6000 resulting in the adjacent twin map heighted summit named as Coed Mawr in the listing of the Humps being 0.11m lower than Rhos Fawr, with this survey confirming this hill’s reclassification from Subhump to Hump status.


The reclassification of this hill from Subhump to Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on 10.05.14.

Gathering data with the Leica GS15 at the summit of the hill listed as Rhos Fawr in the Humps

The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Rhos Fawr (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  307.2m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  136

OS 1:25,000 map:  214

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 99905 88388

Drop:  124m


Myrddyn Phillips (October 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Coed Mawr (SO 013 873) – Hump reclassified to Subhump (20th reclassification)

1st survey post for Coed Mawr

2nd survey post for Coed Mawr


This is the twentieth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

The hill listed as Coed Mawr in the Humps (SO 013 873)

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the first survey of this hill took place on the 07.02.14.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 and which was later confirmed by a survey with the Leica GS15.

Prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Hump with 125m of drop based on the 308m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and the 183m bwlch spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map.  This hill was listed as a twin as a 308m spot height also appears on Ordnance Survey maps for the hill whose summit is positioned at SN 99905 88388.

The hill appears under the name of Coed Mawr in the listing of the Humps, this name appears on current Ordnance Survey maps applicable to the woodland just to the east of the summit of the hill.  However, local enquiry and research via the Tithe map finds that the name of Y Gaer is more appropriate for this hill (see Significant Name Changes).

The hill is adjoined to the Pumlumon group of hills and is situated overlooking the A 470 road and the Afon Hafren (River Severn) which are to its east, with the small community of Llandinam at the base and to the north-east of the hill and the town of Llanidloes towards the west south-west.

This hill and its adjacent twin map heighted summit were surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 07.02.14 resulting in a 91.4m drop value for this hill, with its adjacent twin map heighted summit being 0.055m higher than Coed Mawr, the hill was then re-surveyed on the 02.05.14 by John Barnard, Graham Jackson and Myrddyn Phillips using a Leica GS15 and Trimble GeoXH 6000 resulting in the adjacent twin map heighted summit named as Rhos Fawr in the listing of the Humps being 0.11m higher than Coed Mawr, with this survey confirming this hill’s reclassification from prioritised Hump to Subhump status.


The reclassification of this hill from Hump to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on 10.05.14.

Using level and staff to determine summit position prior to surveying the hill with the Leica GS15

The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Coed Mawr (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  307.1m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  136

OS 1:25,000 map:  214

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 01352 87384

Drop:  90m (as listed in the Humps, 91.4m [converted to OSGM15] as surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000)


Myrddyn Phillips (October 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Old Radnor Hill (SO 251 587) – Subhump addition (19th reclassification)

Survey post for Old Radnor Hill


This is the nineteenth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

The remains of Old Radnor Hill (SO 257 587)

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 11.01.14.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been an addition to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH that was conducted on the 11.01.14.

The hill had previously been listed as a Hump with a 327m summit height and 110m of drop, due to the hill being quarried its drop value was reduced in April 2011 to c 100m based on a reduction in its estimated summit height to c 317m, with it still retaining its Hump status.  The hill was then reclassified to a Subhump in January 2013 based on a 222m bwlch height which gave the hill c 95m of drop.  As well as the summit being reduced in height due to quarrying, there is a road cutting to the east of the hill which if taken as a part of the hill’s drop would increase this value.  The hill was subsequently surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 resulting in a 312.6m (converted to OSGM15) summit height and a 222.7m (converted to OSGM15) height to what was judged to be the highest remaining natural ground of the critical bwlch, and a 215.6m (converted to OSGM15) height to the road cutting, resulting in a 89.9m and 97.1m drop value respectively.  With the hill being temporarily deleted from Subhump status on the 13.09.14 based on the drop value being taken to the highest remaining natural ground nearest to where the critical bwlch once lay.  
  
The hill is adjoined to the Fforest Glud range of hills and is situated overlooking the A 44 road to its east which increases its prominence if this road cutting is included as a part of the drop value, and has the small community of Walton towards the north-north-east and Old Radnor towards the north-west.

The re-instatement of this hill back to Subhump status based on the survey taken to the road cutting was accepted by Mark Jackson and it was added to the listing of the Humps on 22.12.15.

Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at the road cutting to the east of the hill

The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Old Radnor Hill

Summit Height:  312.6m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  148

OS 1:25,000 map:  201

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 25122 58775 (as listed in the Humps, with the Trimble survey taken to SO 25135 58770)

Drop:  97.1m (converted to OSGM15, as listed in the Humps)


Myrddyn Phillips (October 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Old Radnor Hill (SO 251 587) – Subhump deletion (18th reclassification)

Survey post for Old Radnor Hill


This is the eighteenth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

The remains of Old Radnor Hill (SO 251 587)

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the survey of this hill took place on the 11.01.14.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a deletion from the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH that was conducted on the 11.01.14.

The hill had previously been listed as a Hump with a 327m summit height and 110m of drop, due to the hill being quarried its drop value was reduced in April 2011 to c 100m based on a reduction in its estimated summit height to c 317m, with it still retaining its Hump status.  The hill was then reclassified to a Subhump in January 2013 based on a 222m bwlch height which gave the hill c 95m of drop.  As well as the summit being reduced in height due to quarrying, there is a road cutting to the east of the hill which if taken as a part of the hill’s drop would increase this value.  The hill was subsequently surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 resulting in a 312.6m (converted to OSGM15) summit height and a 222.7m (converted to OSGM15) height to what was judged to be the highest remaining natural ground of the critical bwlch, and a 215.6m (converted to OSGM15) height to the road cutting, resulting in a 89.9m and 97.1m drop value respectively. 

The hill is adjoined to the Fforest Glud range of hills and is situated overlooking the A 44 road to its east which increases its prominence if this road cutting is included as a part of the drop value, and has the small community of Walton towards the north-north-east and Old Radnor towards the north-west.

The deletion of this hill from Subhump status based on the survey taken to what was judged to be the highest remaining natural ground of the critical bwlch and was accepted by Mark Jackson and it was deleted from the listing of the Humps on 13.09.14.

Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at what was judged to be the highest remaining natural ground of the critical bwlch

The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Old Radnor Hill

Summit Height:  312.6m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  148

OS 1:25,000 map:  201

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 25122 58775 (as listed in the Humps, with the Trimble survey taken to SO 25135 58770)

Drop:  89.9m (converted to OSGM15)


Myrddyn Phillips (October 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Foel (SH 450 506) – Subhump reclassified to Hump (17th reclassification)

1st survey post for Foel

2nd survey post for Foel

3rd survey post for Foel


This is the seventeenth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

Foel (SH 450 506)

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance from a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the first survey of this hill took place on the 30.12.13.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) instigated by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 and which was later confirmed by a survey with the Leica GS15.

Prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Subhump with c 99m of drop based on the 223m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 124m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals. 

The hill is adjoined to the Moel Hebog group of hills and is situated overlooking the A 487 road which is to its east and the Afon Llyfni which is to its north, with the small community of Pen-y-groes to the north-east and Clynnog Fawr to the west south-west.

Foel was surveyed using a Trimble GeoXH 6000 by Myrddyn Phillips on the 30.12.13 resulting in a 100.9m drop value, the hill was then re-surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 on the 02.02.14 resulting in a 101.6m drop value, it was then again re-surveyed on the 16.02.14 by John Barnard, Graham Jackson and Myrddyn Phillips using a Leica GS15 and Trimble GeoXH 6000 resulting in a 101.2m and 101.1m drop value respectively, which is sufficient for this hill to be reclassified from Subhump to Hump status.



The reclassification of this hill from Subhump to Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps in February 2014.

Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at the summit of Foel

The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Foel

Summit Height:  221.3m (as listed in the Humps, 221.4m converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  115, 123

OS 1:25,000 map:  254

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 45025 50677

Drop:  101.2m (converted to OSGM15)


Myrddyn Phillips (October 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Middle Knoll (SD 654 543) – Hump reclassified to Subhump (16th reclassification)


This is the sixteenth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, or in this instance the Harvey 1:25,000 Forest of Bowland map, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 20.08.13.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Harvey 1:25,000 Forest of Bowland map, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 20.08.13.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 100m of drop based on the 395m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated col height of c 295m based on col contouring at 10m intervals.  However, the Harvey map gives this hill the same 395m summit spot height, but also includes a 296m col spot height, with these values giving this hill 99m of drop, which is insufficient for it to retain its Hump status. 

Extract from the Harvey 1:25,000 Forest of Bowland map showing the 395m summit and 296m col spot heights

The hill is adjoined to the Ward’s Stone group of hills in the Forest of Bowland and is situated overlooking the Brennand River to its west and the Whitendale River to its east, with the small community of Dunsop Bridge towards the hill’s south.

The reclassification of this hill from Hump to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 23.08.13.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Middle Knoll

Summit Height:  395m

OS 1:50,000 map:  102, 103

OS 1:25,000 map:  41

Summit Grid Reference:  SD 65410 54323

Drop:  99m


Myrddyn Phillips (October 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Coed y Cefn (SN 950 682) – Subhump addition (15th reclassification)

Survey post for Coed y Cefn


This is the fifteenth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

Coed y Cefn (SN 950 682)

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 12.06.13.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been an addition to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 12.06.13.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 89m of drop based on a c 341m estimated summit height and a bwlch height of 252m taken from the spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map.  However, the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website gives this hill a 342m summit spot height and when coupled with its 252m bwlch spot height it gives this hill 90m of drop, which is sufficient for it to be classified as a Subhump.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 342m summit and 252m bwlch spot heights

The hill appeared under the name of Ochr-cefn in the Tumps prior to this notification, with this name having appeared in the 300m Welsh P30 list published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website and which was derived from buildings situated to the west of the hill’s summit.  When this notification was posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum brief details relating to the hill’s name were included, due to this post the name of the hill now appears as Coed y Cefn.

The hill is adjoined to the Elenydd group of hills and is situated overlooking the A 470 road, the Afon Gwy (River Wye) and the town of Rhaeadr Gwy (Rhayader) which are all towards the east of the hill.

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and the listing of the Humps was updated accordingly.

Coed y Cefn was subsequently surveyed with a Trimble GeoXH 6000 on the 14.04.15, resulting in this hill having a 342.2m (converted to OSGM15) summit height and a 251.3m (converted to OSGM15) bwlch height, with these values giving this hill 90.8m of drop.


Gathering data with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 at the summit of Coed y Cefn


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Coed y Cefn

Summit Height:  342.1m (as listed in the Humps, 342.2m converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  136, 147

OS 1:25,000 map:  200

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 95081 68222 (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  90.8m (converted to OSGM15)


Myrddyn Phillips (September 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Garth Hill (SS 872 903) – Subhump reclassified to Hump (14th reclassification)


This is the fourteenth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website and the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch base maps available online, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email sent to DJM&M was dated 15.10.12 and the details of this hill were then forwarded to Mark Jackson via email on the 06.12.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website and the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch base maps available online, with these details being sent to Mark Jackson on 06.12.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 99m of drop based on the 257m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 158m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  However, the variety of heights on both summit and bwlch on a number of Ordnance Survey different scaled maps indicated that this hill has 100m or more of drop which is sufficient for its reclassification to Hump status.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch map published in 1884

The hill is adjoined to the Y Cymoedd range of hills and is situated overlooking the A 4063 road and the Afon Llynfi which are to its west, with the town of Maesteg to the north-west of the hill.

The reclassification of this hill from Subhump to Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 08.12.12.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Garth Hill

Summit Height:  259m (as listed in the Humps)

OS 1:50,000 map:  170

OS 1:25,000 map:  166

Summit Grid Reference:  SS 87293 90322

Drop:  101m (as listed in the Humps)


Myrddyn Phillips (September 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Mynydd Caerau (SS 890 944) – Subhump addition (13th reclassification)


This is the thirteenth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email sent to DJM&M was dated 03.10.12 and the details of this hill were then forwarded to Mark Jackson via email on the 04.010.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.

More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being sent to Mark Jackson on 04.10.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 87m of drop based on the 555m spot height given to a triangulation pillar on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 468m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  However, with a 464m spot height appearing at the bwlch of this hill on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website it meant that when coupled with the 555m summit height it gave this hill 91m of drop, which is sufficient for it to be classified as a Subhump.  Since this notification LIDAR data has become publicly available and analysis of these data by Aled Williams gives this hill just under the 90m of drop required for Subhump status.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 464m spot height at the bwlch of this hill

The hill is adjoined to the Y Cymoedd range of hills and is situated overlooking the A 4107 road to its north and the A 4064 road towards its south-east, with the small communities of Blaengarw and Pontycymer towards the hill’s south-east and Abergwynfi towards the hill’s north.

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 01.12.12.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Mynydd Caerau

Summit Height:  555m (as listed in the Humps)

OS 1:50,000 map:  170

OS 1:25,000 map:  166

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 89057 94411 (as listed in the Humps)

Drop:  91 (as listed in the Humps)


Myrddyn Phillips (September 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Coed-swydd (SO 139 646) – Hump reclassified to Subhump (12th reclassification)


This is the twelve in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names or their composition may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I sent to Mark Jackson and copying in the DJM&M team in relation to this hill was dated 02.08.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being sent to Mark Jackson on 02.08.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 100m of drop, based on the 412m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer maps, and an estimated bwlch height of c 312m with its position being incorrectly placed.  However, with a 317m spot height appearing at the bwlch of this hill on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website it meant this hill had less than 100m of drop.  The summit and bwlch height of this hill was examined via Ordnance Survey 1:2,500 mapping with a 1350ft (411.5m) summit height and a 316.3m height at the bwlch confirming this hill has less than 100m of drop.  

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 317m spot height on the area of this hill's bwlch

The hill currently appears under the composition of Coed-swydd in the Humps, having previously been listed as Pen Coed-swydd, and it is adjoined to the Elfael group of hills and is situated above the A 488 road which is to its north-west and the A 44 road to its south, with the small communities of Pen-y-bont towards the west south-west and Llandegley towards the south.

The reclassification of this hill from Hump to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps in December 2012.


The full details for the hill are:


Summit Height:  412m (as listed in the Humps)

Name:  Coed-swydd (as listed in the Humps)

OS 1:50,000 map:  148

OS 1:25,000 map:  200

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 13966 64618

Drop:  95m


Myrddyn Phillips (September 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Fan (SN 672 316) – Subhump addition (11th reclassification)


This is the eleventh in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 28.05.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson

The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 28.05.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 89m of drop based on the 265m spot height given to a triangulation pillar on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 176m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  The summit area of this hill has two uppermost 260m contour rings with the easterly one being where the 265m trig pillar is positioned, whilst the westerly one is given a 267m summit spot height on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website, this when coupled with an estimated bwlch height of 174m – 175m gives this hill sufficient drop for it to be classified as a Subhump.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map showing the 265m spot height adjoined to the trig pillar on the eastern 260m contour ring

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 267m summit spot height on the western 260m ring contour

The hill is adjoined to the Mynydd Mallaen group of hills and is situated overlooking the Afon Tywi (River Towy) and the village of Llangadog to its south-east and the village of Llanwrda to its east.

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 19.07.12.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Fan

Summit Height:  267

OS 1:50,000 map:  146

OS 1:25,000 map:  12, 186

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 67221 31601

Drop:  c 92 (as listed in the Humps)


Myrddyn Phillips (September 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Cefn yr Ogof (SH 916 773) – Subhump reclassified to Hump (10th reclassification)

Survey post for Cefn yr Ogof


This is the tenth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

Cefn yr Ogof (SH 916 773)

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 23.05.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 23.05.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Subhump with c 97m of drop based on the 204m summit spot height given to a triangulation pillar on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 107m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  Subsequently bwlch contour interpolation was helped by the use of 5m contour intervals on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website and therefore the estimated bwlch height could be better refined to c 103m – c 104m, and when coupled with this hill’s 204m summit spot height these values give this hill c 100m – c 101m of drop, which is sufficient for it to be reclassified to Hump status.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 5m contour intervals at the bwlch of this hill

The hill is adjoined to the Rhos group of hills and is situated overlooking the A 547 and A 55 roads and the coast which are to its north and the Afon Dulas which is to its west, with the village of Llanddulas to the north-west of the hill.

The addition of this hill to Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 19.07.12.

Cefn yr Ogof was subsequently surveyed by John Barnard, Graham Jackson and Myrddyn Phillips on the 23.01.14 using a Leica GS15 and a Trimble GeoXH 6000, resulting in this hill having a 204.5m (converted to OSGM15) summit height and a 102.9m (converted to OSGM15) bwlch height, with these values giving this hill 101.6m of drop.


Gathering data with the Leica GS15 at the summit of Cefn yr Ogof

The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Cefn yr Ogof

Summit Height:  204.5m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  116

OS 1:25,000 map:  264

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 91684 77301

Drop:  101.6m (converted to OSGM15)


Myrddyn Phillips (September 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Gray Hill (ST 433 935) – Subhump addition (9th reclassification)


This is the ninth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 18.05.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been an addition to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 18.05.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 39m of drop based on the 273m summit spot height that appears on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map (whilst the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map has a summit spot height of 275m which is the rounded metric equivalent of the 902ft height that appears on the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch map) and an estimated bwlch height of c 234m, with this latter height an obvious error as the bwlch contouring is between 180m – 185m.  The area of the bwlch benefits from having contour intervals at 5m and a 182m spot height on a road on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping on the Geograph website.  With this latter height or an estimated bwlch height of c 183m giving this hill c 90m – 91m of drop if the 273m summit height on the 1:25,000 map is followed, or alternatively c 92m – 93m of drop if the 275m summit height on the 1:50,000 map is followed, whichever value is chosen it is sufficient for this hill to be classified as a Subhump

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website that shows the 273m summit and 182m bwlch spot heights

The hill appears under the name of Gray Hill in the listing of the Humps, this name appears on current Ordnance Survey maps, but for its originator name the Ordnance Survey Draft Surveyors map and the Ordnance Survey One-Inch ‘Old Series’ map have to be consulted, and on each the name Mynydd Llwyd appears.  The Welsh name for this hill is considered more appropriate than its English counterpart (see Language sub heading under Prioritised Decision in the Naming Protocols within the Protocols for the Naming of Hills document).

Extract from the Ordnance Survey Draft Surveyors map giving the hill its Welsh name of Mynydd Llwyd

Extract from the Ordnance Survey One-Inch 'Old Series' map which also gives this hill its Welsh name of Mynydd Llwyd

The hill is adjoined to the Coed Gwent range of hills and is situated overlooking the Wentwood Reservoir which is to its south-west, with the village of Llanfaches (Llanvaches) towards the south.

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson on the 19.07.12 and the listing of the Humps was updated accordingly.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Gray Hill (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  273m (as listed in the Humps)

OS 1:50,000 map:  171, 172

OS 1:25,000 map:  14

Summit Grid Reference:  ST 43399 93559

Drop:  c 90m (as listed in the Humps)


Myrddyn Phillips (September 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Mynydd Gelliwastad (SN 677 014) – Subhump reclassified to Hump (8th reclassification)


This is the eighth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 08.05.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 08.05.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Subhump with c 96m of drop based on the 213m summit spot height given to a triangulation pillar on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 117m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals.  Subsequently bwlch contour interpolation was helped by the use of 5m contour intervals on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website and therefore the estimated bwlch height could be better refined to c 113m, and when coupled with this hill’s 213m summit spot height these values give this hill c 100m of drop, which is sufficient for it to be reclassified to Hump status.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 5m contour intervals at the bwlch of this hill

The hill is adjoined to the Penlle’rcastell range of hills and is situated overlooking the M4 motorway which is to its south and the Lower Clydach River which is to its east, with the village of Clydach also positioned to the east of the hill.

The reclassification of this hill from Subhump to Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 19.07.12.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Mynydd Gelliwastad

Summit Height:  213m

OS 1:50,000 map:  159

OS 1:25,000 map:  165

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 67799 01456

Drop:  c 100m


Myrddyn Phillips (September 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Pen Gilfach-y-rhew (SN 458 223) – Subhump deletion (7th reclassification)


This is the seventh in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 01.05.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 01.05.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Subhump with c 92m of drop based on the 164m summit spot height given to a triangulation pillar on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 72m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals, interpolation of bwlch contouring was helped by the use of 5m contour intervals on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website and the use of a 77m spot height centralised on the area of the bwlch, and when coupled with this hill’s 164m summit spot height these values give this hill 87m of drop, which is insufficient for it to retain its Subhump status.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 5m contour intervals at the bwlch and the 77m spot height

The hill appears under the name of Pen Gilfach-y-rhew in the listing of the Humps, this is an invented name based on the name of the farm to the north-west of the hill’s summit.  As this hill comprises bounded land its details were examined on the Tithe map to the parish of Abergwili, and the enclosed land at the summit of this hill where the triangulation pillar is situated is named Cae Llan.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch map showing that Gilfach-y-rhew is the name of a farm and not the name of the hill

The hill is adjoined to the Mynydd Pencarreg range of hills and is situated overlooking the A40 road and the Afon Annell and Afon Tywi (River Towy) to the south-east, with the town of Caerfyrddin (Carmarthen) towards the west south-west.

The deletion of this hill from Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson on the 06.05.12 and the listing of the Humps was updated accordingly.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Pen Gilfach-y-rhew (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  164m

OS 1:50,000 map:  159

OS 1:25,000 map:  177

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 45827 22317

Drop:  87m


Myrddyn Phillips (September 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Pen-yr-allt (SN 486 219) – Hump reclassified to Subhump (6th reclassification)


This is the sixth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 01.05.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 01.05.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Hump with c 100m of drop based on the 175m summit spot height given to a triangulation pillar on the Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 75m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals, interpolation of bwlch contouring was helped by the use of 5m contour intervals on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website and therefore the estimated bwlch height could be better refined to c 77m, and when coupled with this hill’s 175m summit spot height these values give this hill c 98m of drop, which is insufficient for it to retain its Hump status.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 5m contour intervals at the bwlch of this hill

The hill appears under the name of Pen-yr-allt in the listing of the Humps, with this name having appeared in the original 100m Welsh P30 list published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website with an accompanying note stating Name from buildings to the West.  As this hill comprises bounded land its details were examined on the Tithe map to the parish of Abergwili, and the enclosed land at the summit of this hill is named Cae Pant yr Lan, with the Lan part of this name possibly relating to buildings to the east of the hill, as shown on the extract from the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch map below.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey Six-Inch map showing the trig pillar symbol at the summit of this hill, the farm named Pen-yr-allt-fawr (on left and named Pen-yr-allt on current maps) and the buildings named Lan on the right

The hill is adjoined to the Mynydd Pencarreg range of hills and is situated overlooking the A40 road and the Afon Tywi (River Towy) to the south, with the small community of Nantgaredig to its south-east and the town of Caerfyrddin (Carmarthen) towards its west.

The reclassification of this hill from Hump to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 06.05.12.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Pen-yr-allt (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  175m

OS 1:50,000 map:  159

OS 1:25,000 map:  186

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 48697 21963

Drop:  c 98m


Myrddyn Phillips (August 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Gowbarrow Fell (NY 407 217) – Subhump reclassified to Hump (5th reclassification)


This is the fifth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have been a part of.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, however this reclassification was initiated by a survey conducted by John Barnard, Graham Jackson, Jim Bloomer and myself.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled the Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to a survey conducted by John Barnard, Graham Jackson, Jim Bloomer and myself with a Leica 530 on the 16.04.12.

Gowbarrow Fell (NY 407 217)

The hill had been previously surveyed for summit position and assessment of its drop by Jim Bloomer, Chris Crocker, Graham Jackson and Janet Jackson in October 2011, and prior to this survey Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Subhump with 98m of drop, this drop value was based on the 481m spot height adjoined to a triangulation pillar and an estimated col height of c 383m.  However, Vector mapping gives a 482m spot height south of where the trig pillar is positioned and the area of the col has a 1249.9ft (381.0m) bench mark on the Ordnance Survey 1:10,560 map, these values give this hill 102m of drop, which is sufficient for it to be reclassified to Hump status.

Surveying Gowbarrow Fell

The name of the hill is Gowbarrow Fell and it is adjoined to the Helvellyn range of hills in the Eastern Fells of the Lake District, the hill is situated overlooking the A 5091 road to its west, and the A 592 road and the expanse of Ullswater to its south, and is positioned with the small communities of Dockray to its west and Matterdale End to its north-west.

The addition of this hill to Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 20.04.12.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Gowbarrow Fell

Summit Height:  481.2m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  90

OS 1:25,000 map:  5

Summit Grid Reference:  NY 40731 21724

Drop:  100.1m (converted to OSGM15)


Myrddyn Phillips (August 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Grongaer (SN 573 215) – Subhump deletion (4th reclassification)


This is the fourth in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names and their composition may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum in relation to this hill was dated 15.04.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled the Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a deletion to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 15.04.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Subhump with c 91m of drop based on the 143m summit spot height on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map and an estimated bwlch height of c 52m based on bwlch contouring at 10m intervals, interpolation of bwlch contouring was helped by the use of 5m contour intervals on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website and therefore the estimated bwlch height could be better refined to c 54m, and when coupled with this hill’s 143m summit spot height these values give this hill c 89m of drop, which is insufficient for it to retain its Subhump status.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 5m contour lines at the bwlch of this hill

The hill name appears as Grongaer in the listing of Humps which is its current composition on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map.  However, its composition on the current Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger map is Gron-gaer and it has also been recorded by the Ordnance Survey as Grongar Hill (Six-Inch map and Historical 1:25,000 map).  Whilst preceding the name of the hill with the use of the definite article Y (Y Grongaer) is recommended in A Gazetteer of Welsh Place-Names (University of Wales Press 1967).

The hill is adjoined to the Mynydd Mallaen range of hills and is situated overlooking the Afon Tywi (River Towy) which is to its south-east, and the A 40 road which is to its north, with the town of Llandeilo positioned towards the east of the hill.

The deletion of this hill from Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson on the 21.07.12 and the listing of the Humps was updated accordingly.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Grongaer (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  143m

OS 1:50,000 map:  159

OS 1:25,000 map:  186

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 57315 21592

Drop:  c 89m


Myrddyn Phillips (August 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Llechwedd Melyn (SN 616 987) – Subhump reclassified to Hump (3rd reclassification)


This is the third in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have instigated.

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the third email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum was dated 09.04.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled the Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been a reclassification to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 09.04.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill as a Subhump with c 98m of drop, however with a 196m summit spot height on the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map and a 96m spot height appearing on the area of this hill’s bwlch on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website, these values give this hill 100m of drop, which is sufficient for it to be reclassified to Hump status.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping hosted on the Geograph website showing the 96m spot height on the area of this hill's bwlch and its 196m summit spot height

The hill appears under the name of Llechwedd Melyn in the Humps, with this name having appeared in the original 100m Welsh P30 list published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website and which was derived from Ordnance Survey maps.  As this hill comprises bounded land its details were examined on the Tithe map to the parish of Tywyn, and the enclosed land at the summit of the hill is named Ffridd y Garw on this map, with the enclosed land to the east of the summit named Llechwedd and the enclosed land to the south-east named Gribin.  The latter name matches that used on the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping on the Geograph website, whilst the name Llechwedd is complimentary to the name Llechwedd Melyn and is applicable to the eastern lower slopes of this hill, whilst the enclosed land taking in the summit of this hill is named Ffridd y Garw.

The hill is adjoined to the Tarennydd range of hills and is situated overlooking the Happy Valley which is to its north-east and the A493 road and the coast which is to its west, with the town of Tywyn positioned to the north-west of the hill.

The addition of this hill to Hump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 18.04.12.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Llechwedd Melyn (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  196m

OS 1:50,000 map:  135

OS 1:25,000 map:  23

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 61632 98767

Drop:  100m


Myrddyn Phillips (August 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Vivod Mountain (SJ 169 400) – Subhump addition (2nd reclassification)


This is the second in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that give details to hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the second email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum was dated 30.01.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled the Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson


The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been an addition to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map and later followed by the enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 30.01.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with 85m of drop, this drop value was based on a 559m summit height given in his Tumps list and a bwlch height of 474m, with the latter based on a spot height positioned at SJ 150 393.  This bwlch position was incorrect as it is approximately 1.1km west from where the critical bwlch of this hill is positioned and which already had bwlch contouring between 460m – 470m, which is lower than the 474m spot height that had been used for the height of this hill’s bwlch in the Tumps.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map showing the position of the 474m spot height and lower contouring at the position of the critical bwlch approximately 1km east of its position

The hill appears under the name of Vivod Mountain in the Humps, with this name appearing on current Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger and 1:25,000 Explorer maps.  The word Vivod is an anglicised corruption of the radical unmutated word Meifod, this being a Welsh word meaning middle dwelling.  The landowning estate of Vivod / Y Feifod can be found north-eastward from this hill’s summit.  Although locally known in some areas as Vivod (Feifod) Mountain, the locally known name in the Welsh speaking community is Mynydd y Feifod. 

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 30.01.12.


The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Vivod Mountain (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  559m (as listed in the Humps)

OS 1:50,000 map:  125

OS 1:25,000 map:  255

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 16965 40002

Drop:  96m (as listed in the Humps)



Myrddyn Phillips (August 2017)






Mapping Mountains - Hill Reclassifications - Humps

Pengarn (SN 132 485) – Subhump addition (1st reclassification)


This is the first in a series of Hill Reclassification posts that detail hills whose status has been altered in the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) through map study and / or surveys that I have conducted.

The hill name used in this and forthcoming posts is that used in the listing of Humps, therefore individual names may not match those that are used in listings I am directly associated with.  However, I am of firm belief that listed hill names used by other authors should be respected when giving detail within other people’s lists, however inappropriate some hill names may be considered.

This and forthcoming posts are retrospective as many of these hill reclassifications were initiated from studying the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping that is hosted on the Geograph website, and for the reclassifications that affected the Humps the first email I posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum was dated 27.01.12.

The listing of Humps was published in book format by Lulu in 2009 and entitled More Relative Hills of Britain, its author; Mark Jackson gives credit to a number of people who contributed toward the formation of this list, these include; Eric Yeaman, Alan Dawson, Clem Clements, Rob Woodall, Bernie Hughes, Pete Ridges and others.  When the list was published in book format there were 2987 Humps listed with their criteria being any British hill that has 100m or more of drop, accompanying the main list is a sub category entitled the Subhumps, with the criteria being any British hill that has 90m or more and below 100m of drop.


More Relative Hills of Britain by Mark Jackson



The details for the reclassification appear below:

There has been an addition to the listing of the Humps (HUndred Metre Prominences) due to consulting the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map, with these details being posted on the RHB Yahoo Group forum on 27.01.12.

Prior to this notification Mark Jackson had listed this hill with c 31m of drop, however with a 189m summit height given to a triangulation pillar and bwlch contouring between 95m – 100m with an estimated bwlch height of c 96m, it gives this hill an estimated c 93m of drop, which is sufficient for it to be classified as a Subhump.

Extract from the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map showing heights and contours at the summit and bwlch of this hill

The hill appears under the name of Pengarn in the Humps, with this name having appeared in the original 100m Welsh P30 list published on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website and which was derived from buildings situated north-east of the hill’s summit.

The hill is adjoined to the Mynydd Preseli range of hills and is situated overlooking the coast with Pen Cemaes (Cemaes Head) directly to its north and the small community of Cipin to its south-east.

The addition of this hill to Subhump status was accepted by Mark Jackson and its new classification augmented in to the listing of the Humps on the 28.01.12.



The full details for the hill are:


Name:  Pengarn (as listed in the Humps)

Summit Height:  189m

OS 1:50,000 map:  145

OS 1:25,000 map:  35, 198

Summit Grid Reference:  SN 13213 48502

Drop:  c 92m (as listed in the Humps)



Myrddyn Phillips (August 2017)

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